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aging1 (ˈeɪdʒɪŋ) 

Definitions

noun

  1. = ageing2

aging2 (ˈeɪdʒɪŋ) 

Definitions

adjective

  1. = ageing2

ageing or aging (ˈeɪdʒɪŋ Pronunciation for )

Definitions

noun

  1. the process of growing old or developing the appearance and characteristics of old age
  2. the change of properties that occurs in some metals after heat treatment or cold working

adjective

  1. becoming or appearing older or elderly   ⇒ an ageing car
  2. giving or creating the appearance of age or elderliness   ⇒ that dress is really ageing on her

Synonyms

View thesaurus entry
= growing old or older, declining, maturing, deteriorating, mellowing, in decline, senile, long in the tooth, senescent, getting on or past it
= growing old, decline, decay, deterioration, degeneration, maturation, senility, senescence

Quotations including 'aging'

  • "But at my back I always hearTime's wingèd chariot hurrying near" [Andrew Marvell
  • "Grow old along with me!The best is yet to be" [Robert Browning

age (eɪdʒ Pronunciation for age

Definitions

noun

  1. the period of time that a person, animal, or plant has lived or is expected to live   ⇒ the age of a tree, what age was he when he died?, the age of a horse is up to thirty years
  2. the period of existence of an object, material, group, etc   ⇒ the age of this table is 200 years
    1. a period or state of human life   ⇒ he should know better at his age, she had got beyond the giggly age
    2. (as modifier)   ⇒ age group
  3. the latter part of life
    1. a period of history marked by some feature or characteristic; era
    2. (capital when part of a name)   ⇒ the Middle Ages, the Space Age
  4. generation   ⇒ the Edwardian age
  5. (geology, palaeontology)
    1. a period of the earth's history distinguished by special characteristics   ⇒ the age of reptiles
    2. the period during which a stage of rock strata is formed; a subdivision of an epoch
  6. (mythology) any of the successive periods in the legendary history of man, which were, according to Hesiod, the golden, silver, bronze, heroic, and iron ages
  7. (often plural) (informal) a relatively long time   ⇒ she was an age washing her hair, I've been waiting ages
  8. (psychology) the level in years that a person has reached in any area of development, such as mental or emotional, compared with the normal level for his chronological age See also achievement age, mental age
  9. See age before beauty

  10. See of age

verb

Word forms:  ages,  ageing,  aging,  aged
  1. to grow or make old or apparently old; become or cause to become old or aged
  2. to begin to seem older   ⇒ to have aged a lot in the past year
  3. (brewing) to mature or cause to mature

Word Origin

C13: via Old French from Vulgar Latin aetatīcum (unattested), from Latin aetās, ultimately from aevum lifetime; compare aeon

Synonyms

View thesaurus entry
= years, days, generation, lifetime, stage of life, length of life, length of existence, span, duration, life span
= old age, experience, maturity, completion, seniority, fullness, majority, maturation, senility, decline, advancing years, dotage, declining years, senescence, full growth, agedness, autumn or evening of your life, matureness,
= time, day(s), period, generation, era, epoch
= a long time, years, forever, a lifetime, an eternity, aeons, yonks,
= a long time or while, years, centuries, for ever, aeons, donkey's years, yonks, a month of Sundays, an age or eternity

Quotations including 'aging'

  • "Every man desires to live long, but no man would be old" [Jonathan Swift
  • "The days of our age are threescore years and ten" [Bible: Psalm 90]
  • "Youth, which is forgiven everything, forgives itself nothing; age, which forgives itself anything, is forgiven nothing" [George Bernard Shaw
  • "With age, the mind grows slower and more wily" [Mason Cooley
  • "Age appears to be best in four things - old wood best to burn, old wine to drink, old friends to trust, and old authors to read" [Francis Bacon
  • "If I'd known I was gonna live this long, I'd have taken better care of myself" [Eubie Blake (on reaching the age of 100)]
  • "Grow old along with me!The best is yet to be" [Robert Browning
  • "Growing old is like being increasingly penalized for a crime you haven't committed" [Anthony Powell
  • "There is still no cure for the common birthday" [John Glenn]

Example Sentences Including 'aging'

As he spoke his condensing breath settled and froze on his bushy moustache, flecking it with snow and aging him in front of their eyes.
Dobbs, Michael Wall Games
I was so absorbed with these unwelcome signs of aging that I splashed on my foot.
Stuart Harrison BETTER THAN THIS (2002)
Inside the pocket-sized church an aging abbot appeared blinking from behind the iconostasis.
Marsden, Philip The Crossing-Place
Now aging , he may not be acceptable to the Northern Alliance.
India Today (2001)
The U. S. and British governments are planning to obtain about 3,000 of the new jets to replace their aging fighter inventories.
Globe and Mail (2003)
The U. S. has the world's most sophisticated weaponry, Iraq only aging equipment.
Globe and Mail (2003)
The outer curtain walls were constructed of aging timbers, looked likely to tumble down in a stiff wind.
Penman, Sharon Here Be Dragons
This morning she has finished writing a play with a friend'about older love and aging ' that may get a Broadway release.
Glasgow Herald (2001)

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