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disparaging (dɪˈspærɪdʒɪŋ) 

Definitions

adjective

  1. If you are disparaging about someone or something, or make disparaging comments about them, you say things which show that you do not have a good opinion of them   ⇒ The Minister was alleged to have made disparaging remarks about the rest of the Cabinet.

    to be disparaging about sb   ⇒ She was disparaging about gays.

    to be disparaging about sth   ⇒ He was disparaging about his wife's musical talents.

disparage (dɪˈspærɪdʒ Pronunciation for disparage

Definitions

verb (transitive)

  1. to speak contemptuously of; belittle
  2. to damage the reputation of

Derived Forms

disˈparagement noun
disˈparager noun
disˈparaging adjective
disˈparagingly adverb

Word Origin

C14: from Old French desparagier, from des-dis-1 + parage equality, from Latin par equal

Synonyms

View thesaurus entry
= run down, dismiss, put down, criticize, underestimate, discredit, ridicule, scorn, minimize, disdain, undervalue, deride, slag (off), knock, blast, flame, rubbish, malign, detract from, denigrate, belittle, decry, underrate, vilify, slander, deprecate, tear into, diss, defame, bad-mouth, lambast(e), traduce, derogate, asperse

Translations for 'disparaging'

  • British English: disparaging If you are disparaging about someone or something, or make disparaging comments about them, you say things which show that you do not have a good opinion of them. ADJECTIVEHe was critical of the people, disparaging of their crude manners.
  • Brazilian Portuguese: depreciativo
  • Chinese: 贬低的贬貶低的
  • European Spanish: despreciativo despreciativa
  • French: désobligeant désobligeante
  • German: abschätzig
  • Italian: sprezzante
  • Japanese: 軽蔑の
  • Korean: 얕보는
  • Portuguese: depreciativo depreciativa
  • Spanish: despreciativo despreciativa

Example Sentences Including 'disparaging'

Before Joyce could muster an adequately disparaging reply she caught sight of something glittering through the trees ahead.
Clive Barker THE GREAT AND SECRET SHOW (2001)
Blair made some remark that seemed to Ginny to be disparaging of the attitudes of some Southern members of Congress.
Gaskin, Catherine The Ambassador's Women
But Shimon Peres, the leader of Israel's opposition Labour party, was disparaging.
Times, Sunday Times (2004)
But continued disparaging references to the "glass coffin" had tarnished the proposal, he said.
New Zealand Herald (2003)
Finally, one came forward, looked me up and down, cast a disparaging glance towards the car, jumped in, and drove away.
Kavita Daswani EVERYTHING HAPPENS FOR A REASON (2004)
His was, surely, a warm response and not a disparaging one, I hope.
Times, Sunday Times (2001)
I adored that lively colour and was thoroughly miffed at my friends who said disparaging things.
The Advertiser, Sunday Mail (2004)
Star Wars - the sequel Apologies to Star Wars aficionados for my previous disparaging comments on Star Wars II: Attack of the Clones.
Spiked
This could well have been true but no active man on the wrong side of sixty likes to hear himself described in such disparaging terms.
Howatch, Susan Absolute Truths

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