English Dictionary

Pioneers in dictionary publishing since 1819

drums (drʌmz) 

Definitions

plural noun

  1. (music) a drum kit or set of drums   ⇒ I play drums., with Pete Ryan on drums

drum1 (drʌm Pronunciation for drum1

Definitions

noun

  1. (music) a percussion instrument sounded by striking a membrane stretched across the opening of a hollow cylinder or hemisphere
  2. See beat the drum for

  3. the sound produced by a drum or any similar sound
  4. an object that resembles a drum in shape, such as a large spool or a cylindrical container
  5. (architecture)
    1. one of a number of cylindrical blocks of stone used to construct the shaft of a column
    2. the wall or structure supporting a dome or cupola
  6. short for eardrum
  7. Also called: drumfish. any of various North American marine and freshwater sciaenid fishes, such as Equetus pulcher (striped drum), that utter a drumming sound
  8. a type of hollow rotor for steam turbines or axial compressors
  9. (computing) a rotating cylindrical device on which data may be stored for later retrieval: now mostly superseded by disks See disk (sense 2)
  10. (archaic) a drummer
  11. See the drum

verb

Word forms:  drums,  drumming,  drummed
  1. to play (music) on or as if on a drum
  2. to beat or tap (the fingers) rhythmically or regularly
  3. (intransitive) (of birds) to produce a rhythmic sound, as by beating the bill against a tree, branch, etc
  4. (transitive) sometimes foll by up to summon or call by drumming
  5. (transitive) to instil by constant repetition   ⇒ to drum an idea into someone's head

Word Origin

C16: probably from Middle Dutch tromme, of imitative origin

Synonyms

View thesaurus entry
= barrel, tank, container, cylinder, canister, cask
= pounding, beat, rhythm, thump, thumping, throb, vibration, patter, pitter-patter

drum2 (drʌm Pronunciation for drum2

Definitions

noun

  1. (Scottish & Irish) a narrow ridge or hill

Word Origin

C18: from Scottish Gaelic druim

Example Sentences Including 'drums'

In a series of esoteric calculations, he concluded that Biovail shipped around 30 million tablets in 93 drums.
Globe and Mail (2003)
In place of the lanterns and drums of old we now have angels with dangly legs, pink rose lights and fluffy snowballs.
Belfast Telegraph (2004)
Mason, Greentree, and Robin Jones ( drums ), are all currently working on solo projects.
NME (New Musical Express) (2003)
She ran to where Graham was crouched and ducked down behind the drums.
MacNeill, Alastair Code Breaker
She would deliver anything from a small parcel to pallets of fertilizer or drums of fuel or even schoolchildren.
Lunnon-Wood, Mike Let Not the Deep
The cap, stuck upright in some sludge, was at the foot of the drums.
Robert Wilson BLOOD IS DIRT (2002)
The sound of the drums was menacing, yet even the men sheltered in the very heart of the column knew that something was wrong.
Cornwell, Bernard Sharpe's Waterloo
There's a projection television coming down from the ceiling, a foosball table and a set of drums.
Globe and Mail (2003)
They come from Duluth, Minnesota, and they play guitar, bass, and drums - but not in the traditional manner.
Glasgow Herald (2001)

Comments

Log in to comment on this word.