English Dictionary

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flake1 (fleɪk Pronunciation for flake1

Definitions

noun

  1. a small thin piece or layer chipped off or detached from an object or substance; scale
  2. a small piece or particle   ⇒ a flake of snow
  3. a thin layer or stratum
  4. (archaeology)
    1. a fragment removed by chipping or hammering from a larger stone used as a tool or weapon See also blade
    2. (as modifier)   ⇒ flake tool
  5. (slang, mainly US) an eccentric, crazy, or unreliable person

verb

  1. to peel or cause to peel off in flakes; chip
  2. to cover or become covered with or as with flakes
  3. (transitive) to form into flakes

Derived Forms

ˈflaker noun

Word Origin

C14: of Scandinavian origin; compare Norwegian flak disc, Middle Dutch vlacken to flutter

Synonyms

View thesaurus entry
= chip, scale, layer, peeling, shaving, disk, wafer, sliver, lamina, squama
= chip, scale (off), peel (off), blister, desquamate

flake2 (fleɪk Pronunciation for flake2

Definitions

noun

  1. a rack or platform for drying fish or other produce

Word Origin

C14: from Old Norse flaki; related to Dutch vlaak hurdle

flake3 (fleɪk Pronunciation for flake3

Definitions

verb

  1. (nautical) another word for fake1

flake4 (fleɪk Pronunciation for flake4

Definitions

noun

  1. (in Australia) the commercial name for the meat of the gummy shark

Translations for 'flake'

  • British English: flake A flake is a small thin piece of something, especially one that has broken off a larger piece. NOUN...flakes of paint.
  • Brazilian Portuguese: floco
  • Chinese: 小薄片 >尤指碎片
  • European Spanish: desconchón
  • French: écaille
  • German: Splitter
  • Italian: scaglia
  • Japanese: 破片
  • Korean: 얇은 조각
  • Portuguese: floco
  • Spanish: desconchón

Example Sentences Including 'flake'

A moth spun out of the little pool of light like a flake of skin.
Thomas, Craig The Last Raven
Auckland's mayoralty race is between a fruit-loop and a flake.
New Zealand Herald (2004)
Britons are used to seeing their country grind to a halt with the appearance of a single flake of snow.
Times, Sunday Times (2005)
Even the positives that came in early summer have begun to flake.
Times, Sunday Times (2002)
I remember going to bed Christmas Eve without a flake on the ground... and waking up to a metre.
Edmonton Sun (2003)
One of the clips had a flake of something caught in its teeth.
Robert Wilson INSTRUMENTS OF DARKNESS (2002)
Plato had packed his pipe too tightly with Kenworthy's unfamiliar flake , and was frequently having to relight it.
Hilton, John Buxton Moondrop to Murder
The difference in taste is said to be down to the size of the crystal: the larger the flake the slower the dissolving.
Smith, Drew Food Watch
Then came the moment of truth: I placed a small flint flake under the lens and focused on that ancient surface.
New Scientist (1998)

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