English Dictionary

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ray1 (reɪ Pronunciation for ray1

Definitions

noun

  1. a narrow beam of light; gleam
  2. a slight indication, esp of something anticipated or hoped for   ⇒ a ray of solace
  3. (mathematics) a straight line extending from a point
  4. a thin beam of electromagnetic radiation or particles
  5. any of the bony or cartilaginous spines of the fin of a fish that form the support for the soft part of the fin
  6. any of the arms or branches of a starfish or other radiate animal
  7. (astronomy) any of a number of bright streaks that radiate from the youngest lunar craters, such as Tycho; they are composed of crater ejecta not yet darkened, and extend considerable distances
  8. (botany) any strand of tissue that runs radially through the vascular tissue of some higher plants See medullary ray

verb

  1. (of an object) to emit (light) in rays or (of light) to issue in the form of rays
  2. (intransitive) (of lines, etc) to extend in rays or on radiating paths
  3. (transitive) to adorn (an ornament, etc) with rays or radiating lines

Word Origin

C14: from Old French rai, from Latin radius spoke, radius

ray2 (reɪ Pronunciation for ray2

Definitions

noun

  1. any of various marine selachian fishes typically having a flattened body, greatly enlarged winglike pectoral fins, gills on the undersurface of the fins, and a long whiplike tail. They constitute the orders Torpediniformes (electric rays) and Rajiformes

Word Origin

C14: from Old French raie, from Latin raia

ray3 (reɪ Pronunciation for ray3

Definitions

noun

  1. (music) (in tonic sol-fa) the second degree of any major scale; supertonic

Word Origin

C14: see gamut

Ray1 (reɪ Pronunciation for Ray1

Definitions

noun

  1. See Cape Ray

Ray2 (reɪ Pronunciation for Ray2

Definitions

noun

  1. John. 1627–1705, English naturalist. He originated natural botanical classification and the division of flowering plants into monocotyledons and dicotyledons
  2. Man, real name Emmanuel Rudnitsky. 1890–1976, US surrealist photographer
  3. Satyajit (ˈsætjədʒɪt). 1921–92, Indian film director, noted for his Apu trilogy (1955–59)

Translations for 'ray'

  • British English: ray Rays of light are narrow beams of light. NOUN...the first rays of light spread over the horizon.
  • Brazilian Portuguese: raio
  • Chinese: 光线光线線
  • European Spanish: rayo
  • French: rayon
  • German: Strahl
  • Italian: raggio
  • Japanese: 光線
  • Korean: 광선
  • Portuguese: raio
  • Spanish: rayo

Example Sentences Including 'ray'

Exposed to the sunlight, the ray 's underbelly was smeared with the carmine stripes of its own blood.
Ballard, J. G. Rushing to Paradise
From the violet ray we go into midnight when we have the indigo ray.
Lacy, Marie Louise Know Yourself Through Colour
In this house he and Martha designed together to catch every last ray of warmth and light.
Sara MacDonald SEA MUSIC (2003)
May the Christmas star bring a ray of hope to those disabled people who are less fortunate.
Courier, Sunday Mail (2004)
THOUSANDS of muddy revellers brought a ray of sunshine to yesterday's rain soaked T In The Park.
Sun, News of the World (2001)
The chest x ray showed ``nodules' in her lungs consistent with carcinoma.
British Medical Journal (2002)
There have been dark and difficult times off the pitch for the Blues but Zola is a ray of sunshine.
Sun, News of the World (2002)
There was a ray of hope left open yesterday for coal miners in Hinton.
Edmonton Sun (2003)
`Moses with horns: a mistranslation of the Hebrew, which actually means something like `` ray of light ', I think.
Edward Docx THE CALLIGRAPHER (2003)

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