English Dictionary

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scrutiny (ˈskruːtɪnɪ Pronunciation for scrutiny

Definitions

noun

(plural) -nies
  1. close or minute examination
  2. a searching look
    1. (in the early Christian Church) a formal testing that catechumens had to undergo before being baptized
    2. a similar examination of candidates for holy orders

Word Origin

C15: from Late Latin scrūtinium an investigation, from scrūtārī to search (originally referring to rag-and-bone men), from scrūta rubbish

Translations for 'scrutiny'

  • British English: scrutiny If a person or thing is under scrutiny, they are being studied or observed very carefully. NOUNHis private life came under media scrutiny.
  • Brazilian Portuguese: escrutínio
  • Chinese: 仔细研究仔细細研究
  • European Spanish: escrutinio
  • French: examen minutieux
  • German: Untersuchung
  • Italian: esame accurato
  • Japanese: 監視
  • Korean: 정밀 조사
  • Portuguese: escrutínio
  • Spanish: escrutinio

Example Sentences Including 'scrutiny'

"They're trying to mask their economic rationale with a pseudo-scientific rationale, which in our view does not hold up to scrutiny.
Globe and Mail (2003)
Certainly, there has been no shortage of scrutiny over the past year.
Glasgow Herald (2001)
Our systems will need to be robust, transparent, accountable and subject to constant public scrutiny.
George Monbiot THE AGE OF CONSENT (2003)
Repeated scrutiny of the photographs had filled her with despondency.
Appiganesi, Lisa Dreams of Innocence
She said that if motor insurance cover was to be compulsory, it must be open to scrutiny.
Irish Times (2002)
She was conscious of Stephen subjecting her to a puzzled scrutiny.
Stewart, Michael Compulsion
The decision to reproduce is precisely the sort of choice that we all need to be able to make free from public scrutiny or assessment.
Spiked (2003)
The exact proportion only becomes apparent during scrutiny on the Day of Judgment.
Matthews, Lew A Conviction of Guilt
Yet the performance-enhancing argument hardly stands up to scrutiny.
Glasgow Herald (2001)

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