English - Italian

Italian translation of 'ER'

ER

abbreviation for

  1. (British) (= Elizabeth Regina)
  2. (US) = emergency room

ample

(ˈæmpl)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (large)
    1. (boot of car) ampio (‑a), spazioso (‑a)
    2. (garment) ampio (‑a)
  2. (more than enough)
    1. (money) in abbondanza
    2. (space, means, resources) abbondante, ampio (‑a)
    we have ample reason to believe that ... abbiamo parecchie ragioni per credere che...
    we have ample time to finish it abbiamo tutto il tempo (necessario) per finirlo
    that should be ample (time, money etc) dovrebbe essere più che sufficiente

Example Sentences Including 'ample'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
But as another free trading island nation, the UK has ample opportunity to find ways to adapt and thrive.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
An enormous square hall gives ample space to park a fleet of buggies.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Five adults will have ample room if they are sitting in the front two rows.
The Sun (2009)
Here there is ample space for the the judge to exercise discretion.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
On balance, her ample stomach seems to suggest more impending motherhood than lax calorie control.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
She stays at my house at weekends and we have ample opportunity to make love.
The Sun (2010)
The result is a comfortable home with ample room for the whole family.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
There is ample room in the cellar for reds and whites.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
They also look for something new as well as noting easy access and ample parking space.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
We also need ample luggage space for camping holidays.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Another steel trunk provides ample storage at the foot of the bed, and holds smaller items.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
This should give you ample opportunity to size up their prospects.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Inside there is still more than ample room for the school run or a family holiday.
The Sun (2015)
She had ample opportunity to pay her council tax.
The Sun (2006)
There is ample anecdotal evidence this is happening.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
There is ample documented evidence that alcohol is directly linked to a number of cancers.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
There is ample room for further argument on the standard of review.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
There is an adjacent study and en-suite bathroom, a second bathroom and ample storage space.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Be careful not to assign evil intention to people without ample evidence.
Christianity Today (2000)
There is ample evidence to suggest that the young as well the more mature will experience grief after loss.
Carpenter, Anne & Johnson, Geoffrey Why am I Afraid to Grieve (1994)
This will also ensure that your dog has ample space to pace around in.
Standen, Chris Superdog! Action plans that work for a happy and well-behaved pet (1990)

apt

(æpt)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (suitable)
    1. (remark) appropriato (‑a), adatto (‑a), pertinente
    2. (description) felice, indovinato (‑a), giusto (‑a)
  2. (liable)
    to be apt to do sth avere (la) tendenza a fare qc
    I am apt to be out on Mondays generalmente di lunedì non ci sono
    we are apt to forget that ... tendiamo a dimenticare che...
  3. (pupil, student, able) dotato (‑a), capace

Example Sentences Including 'apt'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
The last of these seems especially apt for a book which concerns itself with the unity of the library and the diversity of its composite parts.
The Times Literary Supplement (2008)
Yet the urge to compose verse and then to publish it had long gripped apt pupils in the schools and university of Ireland.
The Times Literary Supplement (2012)
The image is especially apt for Cooper.
John Fisher Tommy Cooper: Always Leave Them Laughing (2006)
It is an apt choice for the company.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
It was an apt choice.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
It was an apt turn of phrase.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
My father's description is apt.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
The car's name is as apt today as it was more than 30 years ago.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
The most apt description of it I've heard.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
This couldn't be more apt today.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Yet the description seems apt.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
The phrase was apt because it captured the twin aspects of the Swiss, the aesthetic and the forensic.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Which is a pretty apt description.
Ben Nimmo IN FORKBEARD'S WAKE: Coasting Round Scandinavia (2003)
In fact, it's an apt description of his own home.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
The description is an apt one.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
An apt choice, she needs help.
The Sun (2010)
I thought this stanza was particularly apt for last week's budget as we all wonder where exactly we are going to feel the pinch.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
It seems an oddly apt choice of artwork for the world's biggest software company.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Which is ironic given the opposite - significant and rapid - is an apt description of the decline in the credibility of his policy of forward guidance.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
That may be an apt description for ministry aimed at young people.
Christianity Today (2000)

cheap

(tʃiːp)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (low cost, goods) a buon mercato, a basso or buon prezzo, economico (‑a)
    2. (reduced)
      1. (ticket) a prezzo ridotto
      2. (fare) ridotto (‑a)
    3. (poor quality) scadente, di cattiva qualità
    4. (vulgar, mean, joke, behaviour, trick) volgare, grossolano (‑a), dozzinale
    cheap flight volo economico
    it was cheap at the price sono stati soldi ben spesi
    this stuff is cheap and nasty questa roba è veramente scadente
    she bought a dress made of a cheap material ha comprato un vestito di stoffa scadente
    cheaper meno caro (‑a), più economico (‑a)
    the bus is cheaper l'autobus è più economico
    the cheapest seats are £5 i posti più economici vengono cinque sterline
    cheap money (finance) denaro a basso tasso di interesse
    to feel cheap (about) provare vergogna or vergognarsi (di or per)

adverb

  1. a buon prezzo or mercato

noun

  1. on the cheap (informal) a risparmio

Example Sentences Including 'cheap'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
A smaller engine will have significantly cheaper fuel costs and tax.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It would have been relatively easy and cheap to take care of these two side effects.
Peter F. Drucker MANAGEMENT: task, responsibilities, practices (1974)
The proceeds will help the company to secure cheaper and less restrictive bank facilities.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
The strength of the euro has also made it less cheap.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
They are much cheaper than managed funds.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Why are we not getting a big boost from cheap fuel?
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Not cheap but a little goes a long way.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Now we could sell cheap food.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Salad leaves are nutritious and many are easy (and cheap) to grow.
The Sun (2016)
The cheapest way to sell your house of course is to do it yourself.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The days of cheap spuds could soon be over.
The Sun (2012)
The report also found Tuesdays were generally the cheapest day to fly.
The Sun (2016)
They are little more than cheap strippers with a song.
The Sun (2014)
This should mean that design costs will be cheaper and there will be more certainty from the beginning.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
We tend to stay quite local because the prices in our area are relatively cheap.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Where would it be cheaper to buy the hat?
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Will we feel cheap in the morning?
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
But these subsequent scenes have left us feeling cheap and misled.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
His investment approach is to seek out stocks that are relatively cheap, but are yielding a decent amount and this has produced steady returns.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Sport is not just about buying cheap and selling dear.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Much cheaper than insulation and a new roof.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Sometimes this means that a cheaper fare is issued shortly after a sale has closed.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
BRITAIN'S top mortgage lender has warned the days of cheap loans are over.
The Sun (2008)
Cheap to buy and cheap to run.
The Sun (2016)
Economists hoped that higher wages would encourage companies to rely less on cheap labour and lift investment to fix the productivity problem.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It is a bargain and doesn't look or feel cheap at all.
The Sun (2017)
Life is cheaper and more relaxed than in the cities.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Life is far cheaper if you can cook.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Most countries restrict the production and sale of mist nets but they are cheap to buy online.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
She must ensure these firms put profits second to providing this essential service at the cheapest cost.
The Sun (2016)
The official site is easy to use and is also the cheapest way to get a new passport.
The Sun (2013)
You can also find cheaper deals if you are mostly in the red.
The Sun (2014)
The council has pointed out that its cheapest frozen meal costs only 3.30.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
There will be help for all with finding cheaper electricity and bank charges.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)

clean

(kliːn)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (gen) pulito (‑a)
    2. (sheet of paper) nuovo (‑a)
    3. (smooth, clear, outline, movement, break) netto (‑a)
    4. (fair, fight, game) leale, corretto (‑a)
    to wipe sth clean pulire qc
    to make a clean sweep fare piazza pulita
    the doctor gave me a clean bill of health il medico ha garantito che godo di ottima salute
    to make a clean breast of sth togliersi qc dalla coscienza
    a clean record (police) una fedina penale pulita
    to have a clean driving licence or (US) to have a clean record non aver mai preso contravvenzioni

adverb

  1. he clean forgot si è completamente dimenticato
    he got clean away se l'è svignata senza lasciare tracce
    the ball went clean through the window la palla prese in pieno la finestra
    to come clean (informal)
    1. (admit guilt) confessare
    2. (tell unpleasant truth) dire veramente come stanno le cose
    I'm clean out of cigarettes non ho neanche mezza sigaretta

noun

  1. pulita, ripulitura

transitive verb

    1. (gen) pulire
    2. (blackboard) cancellare
    3. (shoes) lucidare
    to clean one's teeth (British) lavarsi i denti
    he never cleans the bath non pulisce mai la vasca da bagno

Example Sentences Including 'clean'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
The room was cramped and its furnishings old, but clean and simple.
Lisa Scottoline ROUGH JUSTICE (2001)
She then stood over him while the deed was done, to ensure he was properly clean.
Jennifer Fallon TREASON KEEP (2001)
The rest was putting crude into Northern Europe and shipping clean out of the refineries.
Robert Wilson BLOOD IS DIRT (2001)

clear

(klɪəʳ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (water) chiaro (‑a), limpido (‑a)
    2. (glass, plastic) trasparente
    3. (air, sky, weather) sereno (‑a)
    4. (complexion) senza brufoli o macchie
    5. (photograph, outline) nitido (‑a)
    6. (conscience) pulito (‑a)
    a clear plastic bottle una bottiglia di plastica trasparente
    on a clear day in una giornata limpida
    1. (sound) chiaro (‑a), distinto (‑a)
    2. (impression, meaning, explanation) chiaro (‑a)
    3. (motive, consequence) ovvio (‑a)
    4. (understanding, proof) certo (‑a), sicuro (‑a)
    5. (profit, majority) netto (‑a)
    a clear case of murder un chiaro caso di omicidio
    to make o.s. clear spiegarsi bene
    have I made myself clear? mi sono spiegato?, sono stato chiaro?
    to make it clear to sb that ... far capire a qn che...
    it is clear to me that ... per me è evidente che...
    as clear as day chiaro come il sole
    three clear days tre giorni interi
    to win by a clear head (horse) vincere di un'incollatura
  1. (free, road, way, space) libero (‑a), sgombro (‑a)
    wait till the road is clear aspetta finché la strada sarà libera
    I have a clear day tomorrow (British) non ho impegni domani
    we had a clear view avevamo una buona visuale
    the ship was clear of the rocks la nave aveva superato il pericolo delle rocce
    we're clear of the police now ora siamo sufficientemente lontani dalla polizia
    all clear! cessato pericolo!

adverb

  1. see loud
  2. clear of distante da
    to keep clear of sb/sth tenersi lontano da qn/qc, stare alla larga da qn/qc
    to stand clear of sth stare lontano da qc
  3. (completely) completamente
    to get clear away svignarsela senza lasciar tracce

noun

  1. to be in the clear (out of debt) essere in attivo (out of suspicion) essere a posto (out of danger) essere fuori pericolo

transitive verb

    1. (place, surface, road, railway track) liberare, sgombrare
    2. (site, woodland) spianare
    3. (pipe) sbloccare
    4. (medicine, blood) purificare
    to clear a space for sth/sb fare posto or spazio per qc/qn
    they are clearing the road stanno liberando la strada
    he cleared the path of leaves ha sgombrato le foglie dal viale
    to clear the table sparecchiare (la tavola)
    to clear one's throat schiarirsi la gola
    to clear the air (figurative) chiarire le cose
    to clear one's conscience togliersi un peso dalla coscienza
    1. (get over, fence etc) scavalcare
    2. (get past, rocks) evitare
    to clear 2 metres (athlete, horse) superare i 2 metri
  1. (declare innocent) discolpare
    to clear sth (with sb) (get permission for) ottenere il permesso (di qn) per qc
    to be cleared of ... essere scagionato dall'accusa di...
    he was cleared of murder fu scagionato dall'accusa di omicidio
    to clear o.s. provare la propria innocenza
    he'll have to be cleared by the security department dovrà superare il controllo del dipartimento di sicurezza
    1. (debt) liquidare, saldare
    2. (stock) svendere, liquidare
    3. (cheque) fare la compensazione di
    to clear a profit avere un profitto netto

intransitive verb

    1. (weather, sky) schiarirsi, rasserenarsi
    2. (smoke, fog) dissolversi, andarsene

Example Sentences Including 'clear'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
He said: 'It does clear up the situation.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
So has this blizzard of data cleared the fog that clouds the path of borrowing costs?
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Yet there are clearer reporting lines now and different sets of shareholders.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
For the very rich, dispensing with art is less about raising money than clearing wall space.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
My skin is now absolutely clear and sparkling.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
No other car maker has taken a clear position on this like us.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Quiet moments with your partner can clear minds and hearts.
The Sun (2016)
The battle was for a clear, distinct soundtrack.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
The shadow is best seen when the sky is clear and the line of sight is long.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Their flagship stores have a minimal amount of products on display and lots of clear space.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Then we could tuck into a steak with a clear conscience.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
There's a promotion in the offing so you make it clear you want to apply.
The Sun (2012)
With each passing month a clear victory in Syria appears farther from reach.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Yet the final result is as clear as sea mist.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Your mind is clear and your emotions calm so you can make the right choices.
The Sun (2012)
He said: 'It was a clear penalty.
The Sun (2017)
The front two finished nicely clear of the rest that day.
The Sun (2013)
There is already one clear parallel between them.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
They were all clear to see.
The Sun (2017)
They would be better off not penalising until they see a clear breach of the law.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Too often he booted it clear when a pass was needed.
The Sun (2016)
So stay clear of heirloom china early on.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Police had to beat back the throng to clear a path for emergency vehicles.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
The coroner was clear that the blame lay elsewhere.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
The scary thing is that this anger has erupted out of a largely clear blue sky.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
The whereabouts of the other three was not clear.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
That they cleared this one is encouraging.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We are happy to make this clear.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Why should we have to wait five weeks for a cheque to clear?
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
To me it was like a bolt of lightning out of a clear sky.
Christianity Today (2000)
Within four years the same ridge had been completely cleared for agriculture.
Radford, Tim & Leggett, Jeremy The Crisis of Life on Earth - our legacy from the second millenium (1990)

clever

(ˈklɛvəʳ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (gen) intelligente
    2. (deft, skilful) abile
    3. (ingenious, idea, person, device) geniale
    she's very clever è molto intelligente
    to be clever at sth essere abile in qc
    he is very clever with his hands è molto abile or bravo nei lavori manuali
    he was too clever for us era più furbo di noi
    a clever system un sistema ingegnoso
    what a clever idea! che idea geniale!

Example Sentences Including 'clever'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
It was an interesting twist, I have to admit, very clever of Bobby.
Laura Lippman IN A STRANGE CITY (2002)
It was a clever move on his part, to place her in his debt without making any kind of move on her.
Val McDermid THE LAST TEMPTATION (2002)
But whatever he is, he is clever, and has long prepared to move against the Kingdom.
Garth Nix LIRAEL: DAUGHTER OF THE CLAYR (2002)
That had been a Pascoe crack, which meant it was likely to be what Dalziel would call arty-farty clever.
Anthony Masters CASCADES - THE DAY OF THE DEAD (2002)

coarse

(kɔːs)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (texture, skin, material) ruvido (‑a)
    2. (salt, sand) grosso (‑a)
    3. (sandpaper) a grana grossa
    4. (vulgar, character, laugh, remark) volgare
    the bag was made of coarse black cloth la borsa era fatta di una stoffa nera ruvida
    the sand is very coarse on that beach la sabbia di quella spiaggia è molto grossa

cold

(kəʊld)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (also figurative) freddo (‑a)
    it's cold fa freddo
    it's a cold day fa freddo oggi
    I'm cold ho freddo
    are you cold? hai freddo?
    my feet are cold ho freddo ai piedi, ho i piedi freddi
    to catch cold prendere freddo
    to get cold (person) infreddolirsi (food etc) freddarsi, diventare freddo (‑a)
    it's getting cold (weather) comincia a far freddo
    the room's getting cold comincia a far freddo in questa stanza
    I can't stand the cold non sopporto il freddo
    to be out cold (informal, unconscious) essere privo (‑a) di sensi
    to knock sb (out) cold mettere qn fuori combattimento
    in cold blood a sangue freddo
    it leaves me cold (informal) non mi fa né caldo, né freddo
    to get cold feet (figurative) avere fifa
    it's cold comfort è una magra consolazione
    to put sth into cold storage (food) mettere qc in cella frigorifera (figurative, project) accantonare qc

noun

  1. (meteorology) freddo
    to feel the cold sentire il freddo
    to be left out in the cold (figurative) essere lasciato (‑a) in disparte
  2. (medicine) (also common cold) raffreddore m
    to catch a cold prendere un raffreddore
    to have a cold avere il raffreddore
cold is not translated by the Italian word caldo

Example Sentences Including 'cold'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
It was bitterly cold now and the ground was frozen hard.
Hibbert, Christopher Red Coats and Rebels - the war for America 1770-1781 (1990)
But the thought of it just leaves me cold.
The Sun (2010)
If he catches a cold it hits him a lot harder than anyone else.
The Sun (2012)
It's not necessary for most minor illnesses such as coughs, colds or sore throats.
The Sun (2016)
Leave to go cold and place in a serving dish.
The Sun (2013)
None of us had a single cough or cold during the winter we lived there.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Sadly that liquid is a reservoir of methane cold enough to make bananas as fragile as porcelain.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
She takes it for coughs, colds and sore throats.
The Sun (2016)
The chances are you get fewer colds and infections.
The Sun (2014)
The cold temperature naturally helps tighten the skin.
The Sun (2017)
The troops suffered atrocious conditions in bitterly cold winters, with temperatures down to minus 30C.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
We have tested the best clothes for those temperatures in a cold chamber.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
When warm air rises from your body it draws cold air up your knees.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
White blood cell counts are raised when people suffer frequent illness such as colds.
The Sun (2015)
You think these people can be swayed by cold, hard sense about economics?
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
He can blow hot and cold but when his game is on he is unstoppable.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
When he sees it in the cold light of day he will see it was harsh.
The Sun (2013)
He woke up with a cold body next to him.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
The gun metal is cold and hard.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
They must simply distinguish between a good cold dish and a bad cold dish.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Cats can be cold like that.
The Sun (2016)
His only change was to capitalise cold and war.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
It will come as no surprise to hear that this month has proved wetter and colder than average.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Perhaps you come from a cold home background and need help to thaw.
The Sun (2007)
Sometimes it makes us cold and wet and sometimes it makes us warm.
The Sun (2011)
The ration packs were designed for a cold war.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Their walk is the ideal way to stay safe in cold weather.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
They found the germs thrived when it was cold outside and dry indoors.
The Sun (2009)
Why does it feel much colder than the weather forecasts say it is?
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
You can deal with doubts and romance goes from cold to red hot.
The Sun (2008)
You can handle the cold for a short period of time.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
No cold dead eyes or razor teeth.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Pour yourself a cold one and get comfortable on the sofa.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)

cool

(kuːl)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (gen) fresco (‑a)
    2. (drink) freddo (‑a)
    3. (dress) fresco (‑a), leggero (‑a)
    4. (calm) calmo (‑a)
    5. (unenthusiastic, unfriendly) freddo (‑a)
    6. (impertinent) sfacciato (‑a)
    it's cool (weather) fa fresco
    a cool top una maglietta leggera
    to keep sth cool or in a cool place tenere qc in fresco or al fresco
    to be cool towards sb essere freddo (‑a) con qn
    to keep cool mantenersi fresco (‑a) (figurative) conservare la calma
    keep cool! calma!
    play it cool! fa' finta di niente!
    they think it's cool to do drugs pensano che sia figo drogarsi
    to be as cool as a cucumber (figurative) essere imperturbabile, conservare il sangue freddo
    he's a pretty cool customer (informal) ha un gran sangue freddo (pejorative) ha una bella faccia tosta
    that was very cool of you! (informal) che sangue freddo!
    we paid a cool £290,000 for that house (informal) abbiamo pagato la bellezza di 290.000 sterline per quella casa

noun

  1. in the cool of the evening nella frescura serale
    to keep sth in the cool tenere qc al fresco
    to keep one's cool (informal) conservare la calma
    keep your cool! calma!
    to lose one's cool (informal) perdere la calma or le staffe

transitive verb

    1. (air) rinfrescare, raffreddare
    2. (food) raffreddare
    3. (engine) far raffreddare
    cool it! (informal) calmati!
    to cool one's heels (informal) aspettare (a lungo)

intransitive verb

  1. (air, liquid) raffreddarsi

Example Sentences Including 'cool'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
It is a bit less cool than his previous books.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Once cooked, drain and set the haddock to one side to cool slightly.
The Sun (2017)
Remove from the oven and leave to cool while you make the chilli caramel.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
She looks down and back up, meeting my gaze with cool blue eyes.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Store in a dry cool place out of direct sunlight.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
That would be an extremely cool one to get.
The Sun (2014)
Thaw overnight at cool room temperature and cook as directed.
The Sun (2016)
There are sandy beaches and a cooling breeze.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
They look cool and keep your head warm.
The Sun (2014)
We were referencing all sorts of cool things on that.
The Sun (2011)
Will any of the stadiums have a cool cable car?
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
You could be surprised by the way you conduct cool cash deals.
The Sun (2011)
Your emotions cool so you can see your life more clearly and make realistic but exciting plans.
The Sun (2010)
Your mind is working fast but your emotions stay cool, so you can still talk convincingly about ideas - and the right person is listening.
The Sun (2016)
And he clearly has a cool head tactically.
The Sun (2016)
It will be a time for cool heads.
The Sun (2014)
Stunning winner after cool finish for equaliser.
The Sun (2013)
To win after what they did to us there was pretty cool.
The Sun (2015)
We must remain with the cool head.
The Sun (2009)
You just have to rise above it and keep your cool.
The Sun (2016)
Going out with a thirtysomething when you are barely into your twenties is the coolest thing a man can do.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
The car lights are extinguished and we stand in the blue shadows and cooling dust.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
There are lots of cool ones to choose from.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
They just want to make something cool.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We were the coolest thing in the valley.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Its evaporation from the skin cools the body.
Mayes, Adrienne The Dictionary of Nutritional Health (1986)
It was me who looked away and walked out into the cool night air.
The Sun (2016)
My wife says it has been kind of cool.
The Sun (2007)
Some say that managerial cool is both his strength and his weakness.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
Temperatures will cool down a little bit.
The Sun (2010)
There is something cool and businesslike about you and people take what you say seriously.
The Sun (2009)
They are really cool and more edgy than the shopping centres.
The Sun (2013)
This means cool air is able to burrow down into the lower layers of the atmosphere.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
Will the weather remain cool and unsettled in the week ahead?
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
You have to try to keep him cool and calm by blowing on him.
The Sun (2006)

coy

(kɔɪ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (affectedly shy)
      1. (person) che fa il (la) vergognoso (‑a)
      2. (smile) falsamente timido (‑a)
    2. (evasive) evasivo (‑a)
    3. (coquettish) civettuolo (‑a)

Example Sentences Including 'coy'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
This year they are being a little more coy about buying.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Curiously, Mercedes appears a little coy about telling us what it is.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Hollywood said he'would be interested' in being involved in the programme but remained coy about whether there were any plans for him to take a part.
The Sun (2012)
She has also chosen to remain coy when it comes to her love life.
The Sun (2014)
The women have to be a bit more coy.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
But both clubs yesterday remained coy about whether they were still interested.
The Sun (2014)
For now, he remains coy.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
So it was surprising that he was a little less coy when it came to the subject of appearance fees.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
She remains coy about how they met.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Think you're being coy and modest?
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
Both sides yesterday remained coy over the apparent mix-up.
The Sun (2012)
Glorious triumph against Scotland and a coy little collapse against Ireland?
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
She emerged smiling but remained coy about her vote.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
The Liberal Democrats are also being coy and modest.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
The mayor remains coy for now.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)

crisp

(krɪsp)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (bacon, biscuit, lettuce) croccante
    2. (snow) fresco (‑a)
    3. (bank note) nuovo (‑a) di zecca
    4. (linen) inamidato (‑a)
    5. (air) fresco (‑a), frizzante
    6. (manner, tone, reply) secco (‑a), brusco (‑a)
    7. (style) conciso (‑a) e vivace

Example Sentences Including 'crisp'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
The morning was cold and crisp.
Edward Beauclerk Maurice THE LAST OF THE GENTLEMEN ADVENTURERS: Coming of Age in the Arctic (2004)
Bake in the oven for 8-10 min until the topping is golden and the pizza bases are crisp.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Bright red blood in crisp white snow.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
By the morning the slices should be crisp.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
It is perfect for classy snacks and impromptu meals with baked potatoes and a crisp chicory salad.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Roll in flour and fry until crisp and golden.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Serve alone or with thin, crisp dessert biscuits.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
Team with a crisp white shirt and a pair of canvas boots for a more casual look.
The Sun (2014)
The physical toys and the game graphics look crisp and clean in their comic book treatment.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Turn over the bacon and crisp the other side.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
You can feel the crisp chill of a glass of white.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
You want the bottoms to become nice and crisp.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Each wake was scratched crisp and white upon the azure ocean.
Len Deighton Bomber (2006 (1970))
Something crisp and crackling was wrapped around her.
Tepper, Sheri S. A Plague of Angels (1993)
The air was crisp and dry.
Len Deighton Bomber (2006 (1970))
It was really sharp and crisp.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
The skin needs to be dry if you want it to crisp in the oven.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
There were two bunks with purple blankets and crisp white sheets.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Its research found that people were likely to snack on crisps and biscuits for three days if their kitchen cupboards were full.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Lunch would be a big tuna mayonnaise or cheese sandwich, crisps and biscuits.
The Sun (2007)
The crisps will stay fresh and crunchy until next time.
The Sun (2014)
Two pints of vodka please and a packet of cheese and onion crisps.
The Sun (2008)
We just want to make crisps.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
He also grabbed a packet of crisps from the bar area.
Jan Fennell FRIENDS FOR LIFE (2003)
The afternoon was crisp and beautifully clear.
Marsden, Philip The Crossing-Place (1993)

cross

(krɒs)

noun

    1. (mark, symbol) croce f
    2. (on questionnaire) crocetta, croce
    Greek/Latin cross croce greca/latina
    to mark with a cross segnare con una crocetta
    we each have our cross to bear (figurative) ognuno ha la propria croce (da portare)
  1. (zoology, biology) incrocio, ibrido
    it's a cross between geography and sociology è un misto di geografia e sociologia
  2. (bias)
    cut on the cross tagliato (‑a) in sbieco

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (angry) arrabbiato (‑a), seccato (‑a)
    to be/get cross with sb (about sth) essere arrabbiato (‑a)/arrabbiarsi con qn (per qc)
    it makes me cross when ... mi fa arrabbiare quando...
    he was cross about something era arrabbiato per qualcosa

transitive verb

    1. (gen) attraversare
    2. (threshold) varcare
    this road crosses the motorway questa strada incrocia or interseca l'autostrada
    it crossed my mind that ... mi è venuto in mente che...
    we'll cross that bridge when we come to it (figurative) ogni cosa a tempo debito
  1. (cheque, letter t) sbarrare
    to cross o.s. farsi il segno della croce, segnarsi
    cross my heart! giuro (sulla mia vita)!
    1. (arms) incrociare
    2. (legs) accavallare, incrociare
    to keep one's fingers crossed (figurative) fare gli scongiuri
    to cross swords with sb (figurative) scontrarsi con qn
    we've got a crossed line (British, on telephone) c'è un'interferenza
    they've got their lines crossed (figurative) si sono fraintesi
  2. (thwart, person, plan) contrastare, ostacolare
  3. (animals, plants) incrociare

intransitive verb

  1. (also cross over)
    the boat crosses from Dieppe to Newhaven il traghetto fa la traversata da Dieppe a Newhaven
    1. (roads) intersecarsi
    2. (letters, people) incrociarsi

Example Sentences Including 'cross'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
Within seconds she disappeared into a cross street.
Bachmann, Susan (editor) & Barth, Melinda Between Worlds: A Reader, Rhetoric and Handbook (1995)
So the pair kept their fingers crossed this time.
Moynihan, John Kevin Keegan - Black and White (1993)
From a standing position bend your left knee and cross your right leg around your left leg, hooking your right foot on your left leg.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
One in four people worry about how cross they feel and almost a third of us have trouble controlling our anger.
The Sun (2014)
The challenge is to help people to understand the new direction and work in concert rather than at cross purposes.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
WHEN offered the opportunity to cross something off your bucket list you do it, right?
The Sun (2016)
Drivers wanting to cross those routes can expect longer waits at the lights as a result.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
The winger crossed either side of halftime to take his tally for the season to six.
The Sun (2014)
They also face accusations of crossing another line.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Two things crossed my mind.
The Sun (2017)
Why did the marshal cross the road?
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Football may not yet (fingers crossed) be about to lose one of its favourite sons to retirement.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Women will cross the street to ask you where you got your dress.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Our paths crossed by chance one morning and we chatted about old times.
The Sun (2012)
She has a bright red scar in the shape of a cross on her forehead.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
That means you have space out wide and are able to get in more crosses.
The Sun (2016)
The trust has been attacked by animal rights groups for allowing legal hunts to cross its land.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
The whole thing about crossing their legs and what they should wear.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
They moved 350 miles to Cornwall where the collie cross vanished and spent all their spare time trying to track her down.
The Sun (2006)
This suggests we have crossed a boundary.
The Sun (2012)
When the camera is off you can see his face crossed with pain.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
One squadron took two days to cross a river, the men working the whole time quite naked.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
They belong to the poppy family, and have four petals arranged in the shape of a cross.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
They chose a red cross on white field for their banner and symbol.
Christianity Today (2000)
The idea of writing something had crossed my mind.
Miller, James The Passion of Michel Foucault (1993)
The only other play areas involve crossing three main roads.
Rowbotham, Sheila The Past is Before Us - feminism in action since the 1960s (1989)
Where the two cross, you will find your site.
Brennan, J. H. A Guide to Megalithic Ireland (1992)

daft

(dɑːft)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (informal) sciocco (‑a)
    to be daft about sb aver perso la testa per qn
    to be daft about sth andare pazzo (‑a) per qc

Example Sentences Including 'daft'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
To pretend otherwise and act all hurt is plain daft.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
All over the country we are voting for the party leaders - and for reasons that are just plain daft.
The Sun (2010)
And daft ideas and practices receive no opposition.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
But daft names aside, it's an absolute belter.
The Sun (2015)
But it is daft to think that you can change your habits just because you've changed your calendar.
The Sun (2009)
I look at my big daft name on the back wall and nervously come down the stairs.
The Sun (2010)
In fact I could see that putting an orange in the middle of something is actually plain daft.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It is daft to think you can get away with eating rubbish and not gain weight.
The Sun (2008)
It was a bit daft.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
She could make a Panasonic instruction manual compelling, and was at least watchable while going through this rather daft and unbelievable story of class.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
THIS is not the work of a band but rather a solo artist with a daft stage name.
The Sun (2010)
At this stage of the campaign, removing your leading scorer is just plain daft.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
The latter is a daft thing to say.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Without this unspoken accord, the entire thing is rather daft.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The world breathed a sigh of relief and gave him a rather daft Nobel prize.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
I just hope her daughter can forgive being lumbered with the obligatory daft showbiz name.
The Sun (2006)
Now with his daft prison ideas he is worse than a menace.
The Sun (2011)
The funny thing is that both of those daft ideas have come to life.
The Sun (2013)
The storylines are a bit daft but transport you to another world.
The Sun (2013)
The unexpected sunshine left some people looking a bit daft.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
We laugh at the daft things he did.
The Sun (2013)
We want him to say daft things that make us laugh.
The Sun (2009)
We're absolutely ready to be silly and wear extremely daft things.
The Sun (2013)
When is he going to realise he looks a bit daft?
The Sun (2008)
This good but faintly daft idea is not new.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
To pretend otherwise is plain daft.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Who was so daft as to think it was about anything else?
Times, Sunday Times (2010)

damp

(dæmp)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. umido (‑a)
    damp with perspiration madido (‑a) di sudore
    that was a damp squib (informal) è stato un vero fiasco

noun

  1. (dampness) umidità, umido

transitive verb

  1. = dampen

Example Sentences Including 'damp'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
I always think of this time of the year as wet and damp!
Crawshaw, Alwyn Crawshaw's Watercolour Studio (1993)
Arrange on a tray, cover with a damp tea towel and set aside to rest.
The Sun (2017)
Cover the sponge with a slightly damp tea towel and set aside until cold.
The Sun (2012)
Cover with a damp tea cloth and leave to double in size, about an hour.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Not a total damp squib but still too soggy for our liking.
The Sun (2015)
The house smelt of damp then and still does now.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The problem is damp air and freezing cold nights.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
There are damp patches on the ceilings.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
They particularly favour low, damp patches at the edge of lawns where there is some shelter from trees.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
Tie damp hair in a bun and allow to dry naturally.
The Sun (2012)
Use a few drops on slightly damp skin to trap moisture.
The Sun (2013)
We go and lie down in the corner and place a damp towel over our forehead.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
We had a major problem with damp in the house.
The Sun (2014)
Other drivers reported that it was becoming very difficult to pick out the dry line between the darker damp patches.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
When the weather is cold or damp you will hit about ten to fifteen yards less.
O'Connor, Christy & Smith, Peter Christy O'Connor Junior's Golf Masterclass (1993)
I remember it as being still slightly damp.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Set aside, covered with a damp cloth in the fridge if you are doing this in advance.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Smooth through damp hair for five minutes once a week for visibly healthier hair.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
You should be able to wipe away superficial dirt with a damp (not wet ) cloth.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
In damp, dark woods there is a flower that glimmers in the shadows.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It is dark and damp and the smell is unbearable.
The Sun (2009)
It should be kept in damp conditions to be stable, but some teachers have left it in dry cupboards, making it volatile.
The Sun (2016)
She says:'In the morning tie back damp hair with day.
The Sun (2016)
The fire was caused by a neighbour who placed a damp towel over a lamp.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
There is hope in the damp air at last.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Wipe it with a damp cloth and dry with soft kitchen roll.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Wipe leaves with a damp cloth to remove them.
The Sun (2015)
They need protection from cold and damp.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Use one to wipe up the vomit and the other to put over the damp patch.
Pearce, John (Dr.) Good Habits, Bad Habits (1994)
I steadied myself with a hand on the damp wall.
Marsden, Philip The Crossing-Place (1993)
The regiments that had spent the night marching lay down to sleep in wet clothes and probably woke up to fight the battle still very damp.
Marius, Richard A Short Guide to Writing About History (1995)

dank

(dæŋk)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. freddo (‑a) e umido (‑a)

Example Sentences Including 'dank'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
It was dank and dark.
The Times Literary Supplement (2014)
Place it somewhere cool and bright and out of the sun, but not in some cold, dank corner with no air passing round it.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Yesterday we spied her, as her own funeral played out, bereft in a dank cellar.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
It was followed by fillet steak in a dank, dark sauce made of ancient balsamic vinegar.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Perhaps we were unlucky, but instead of an open top double-decker we got a dank and dark coach.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
And bright and open plains are mixed up with dank caves.
The Sun (2016)
The pictures also show the dank, dark conditions the miners endured for two months.
The Sun (2010)
The room was cold and slightly dank.
Appelbaum, Richard P. Sociology (1995)

dark

(dɑːk)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (lacking light, room, night) scuro (‑a), buio (‑a)
    it is/is getting dark è/si sta facendo buio
    the dark side of the moon l'altra faccia della luna
    1. (in colour) scuro (‑a)
    2. (complexion, hair, colour) scuro (‑a), bruno (‑a)
    dark blue/red blu/rosso scuro inv
    a dark green sweater un maglione verde scuro
    dark brown hair capelli castano scuro
    he's tall, dark and handsome è alto, bruno e bello
    dark chocolate cioccolata amara
  2. (figurative)
    1. (sad, gloomy) nero (‑a), tetro (‑a), cupo (‑a)
    2. (sinister, secret, plan, threat) oscuro (‑a)
    to keep sth dark non far parola di qc

noun

  1. the dark il buio, l'oscurità
    in the dark al buio
    before dark prima che faccia (or facesse) buio
    after dark col buio, a notte fatta
    until dark fino a sera
    to be in the dark about sth (figurative) essere all'oscuro di qc

Example Sentences Including 'dark'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
Her dark lustrous hair was cut short and parted in the centre of her head.
John Cornwell Seminary Boy (2006)
Apply the dark colour underneath your cheekbones and the paler highlighter on top.
The Sun (2016)
Dark means not evading the sad and inexplicable complexities of life.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
In the final two rooms, something darker and more visceral occurs.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It was a dark and stormy night.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
My tip is always to go a shade darker than your hair.
The Sun (2012)
The moment passed but the darkness is so dark, the pain so painful.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
The pale colouring makes it useful for lighting up dark corners in partial to full shade.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The tonal range of the earlier embraces the very light and very dark.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
There was something very dark going on there.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Until a dark secret is unearthed that sends the romance plummeting out into orbit, that is.
The Sun (2016)
You experience all your negative rejections and all your dark places.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
The Potters have suffered as their use of the dark arts has been outlawed.
The Sun (2016)
What a dark shadow that man spreads.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
If you have dark skin, purple is glorious.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It comes in dark brown or clear.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
One has yellow undertones and is ideal the darker colour is good for blemishes.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Sun damage can often lead to unsightly dark patches of skin.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
There was one message that stood out like police lights on a dark city street.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Use medium to dark shadow at the outer corners.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
In one scene, six people emerge from the same dark blue tent.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
It's hard to find the dark when darkness has no keep.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
One was blue and white plaid and the second was dark blue with red dots.
The Sun (2016)
The room was all dark and gloomy.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
There is also a darker side to the years of campaigning.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
They suit pale skin and dark hair best.
The Sun (2016)
This little pen disguises dark circles by bouncing light away from the face.
The Sun (2007)
Use the darker tip to line the bottom lip.
The Sun (2014)
You were forced for years to carry this darkest of secrets.
The Sun (2012)
My hair is growing back the same dark brown colour it was before.
Steel, Elizabeth Coping With Sudden Hair Loss (1988)
Those with darker skin were left standing outside.
Christianity Today (2000)

deaf

(dɛf)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. sordo (‑a)
    deaf in one ear sordo (‑a) da un orecchio
    to be deaf to sth (figurative) restare sordo (‑a) a qc
    to turn a deaf ear to sth fare orecchi da mercante a qc
    as deaf as a (door)post sordo (‑a) come una campana

plural noun

  1. the deaf i sordi

Example Sentences Including 'deaf'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
The narrator makes himself deaf from playing the drums and settles into a gentle life.
The Times Literary Supplement (2011)
Others were unable to identify the stick carried by deaf and blind pedestrians.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
He is so deaf you will hear all our secrets.
Elizabeth Gaskell North and South (1855)
As I was deaf it was hard for them to explain it to me.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
He is now profoundly deaf.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Numerous studies have found that loud guitar music makes fans go deaf and that concerts encourage drug-taking.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
She is a grandmother, partially deaf and takes out her hearing aids to swim.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Almost nine million people in Britain are deaf or hard of hearing.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Although he began to learn sign language at just 15 months old, being deaf made it hard for him to make friends.
The Sun (2010)
And pity the nine million partially deaf people on these islands.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Don't let jealousy make you deaf or he may get fed up with reassuring you.
The Sun (2008)
He says he is partially deaf because of listening to music on headphones.
The Sun (2006)
It will also help protect the deaf and people who leave their homes empty.
The Sun (2011)
New ones must help people who are deaf or blind.
The Sun (2012)
Others have been left deaf or blind.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
She said they showed deaf people could be more proficient in jobs which involved seeing a wide area of activities quickly.
The Sun (2010)
She's a partially blind and deaf thalidomide victim awaiting spinal surgery.
The Sun (2013)
The problem left him partially deaf.
The Sun (2008)
They are deaf and blind to public dismay at the cultural tsunami heading their way.
The Sun (2015)
They ticked the boxes but were deaf and blind to the possibility of injustice.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Week 1 Puppies are born blind and deaf and with a limited sense of smell.
The Sun (2016)
When you are too cosy with the money interests you are going to become tone deaf to the people.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The Times has received a number of complaints from deaf people about unfair treatment.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
He promptly calls his fiancée with his (until now deaf) ear to the phone.
Christianity Today (2000)

dear

(dɪəʳ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (loved, lovable) caro (‑a)
    I hold it very dear mi è molto caro
    my dearest wish il mio più ardente desiderio
    what a dear little boy! che amore di bambino!
    a dear little cottage una casetta deliziosa
  2. (in letter writing)
    Dear Daddy/Peter Caro papà/Peter
    Dearest Paul Carissimo Paul
    Dear Mr/Mrs Smith Gentile Signor/Signora Smith
    Dear Mr and Mrs Smith Gentili Signori Smith
    Dear Sir/Madam Egregio Signore/Gentile Signora
  3. (expensive) caro (‑a)
    dear money (business) denaro ad alto interesse

exclamation

  1. oh dear! oh Dio!, mamma mia!
    dear me! Dio mio!

noun

  1. caro (‑a)
    my dear caro (‑a) mio (‑a)
    my dearest amore mio
    (you) poor dear! poverino!
    he's a dear! (informal) è un tesoro!
    post this letter for me, there's a dear (informal) sii gentile, imbucami questa lettera

adverb

  1. caro
    to pay dear for sth pagare caro qc
    he bought his freedom dear la sua libertà gli è costata cara

Example Sentences Including 'dear'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
But the mortgagebacked securities scandal has also cost the banks dear because of the huge fines they have faced as a result.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Car insurance could also cost motorists dear if they buy it through their bank rather than shopping around.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Failure to capitalise on branding opportunities can cost firms dear.
Tom Cannon Basic Marketing. Principles and Practice (1986)
My dear fellow, is that you?
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
This failure to understand the business cost the company dear.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
Do come back dear soon.
Katie Hickman COURTESANS (2003)
She was a dear little thing.
Max Arthur Lost Voices of the Edwardians: 1901–1910 in the words of the Men & Women Who Were There (2006)
It got me thinking about other brands dear to my heart that improve my physical, mental and emotional wellbeing.
The Sun (2016)
Mercury promises success when you write about a topic you hold dear.
The Sun (2014)
My daughter followed him upstairs as she heard him saying 'Oh dear' and shut the door behind him.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
Oh dear - this just won't do.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Will send money soon, dear.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Everything is so much dearer in a town.
Elizabeth Gaskell North and South (1855)
It is so dreadful to think of our dear Arthur in prison!
Arthur Conan Doyle The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1892)
The dear fellow wanted to see if the missing piece were at the scene of the struggle.
Arthur Conan Doyle The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1892)
But poor running between the wickets and rash shot selection cost them dear.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
How have my dear old Scotland not won a game?
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
It made me think about what we hold dear.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Leicester looked second best all afternoon and their lack of discipline, with three yellow cards, also cost them dear.
The Sun (2016)
These five days have cost Arsenal dear.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It might be an idea to leave your dear old maiden aunt behind.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Maybe I should get that hypnotist back dear!
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
This is a subject dear to my heart.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Across from the flat was a dear little shop.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
And that momentary fantasy costs you dear because as you land, you twist your knee.
The Sun (2016)
Despite what the executives say, the credit crunch has reduced bank liquidity to a trickle and money itself is dearer.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
She said:'I have no doubt that the loss of her close and very dear friend in very tragic circumstances would have had a profound effect.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We had to hold on for dear life.
The Sun (2016)
We welcome those who are prepared to make a stand to defend all they hold dear regardless of the cost.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
You introduce them to the new godparents as you would introduce any other dear friends.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
My 'oh dear' was involuntary.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Oh dear, it's geography fail time again.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Our unique role also becomes dear when leaders surface to carry out a particular ministry and when resources become available.
Christianity Today (2000)

deep

(diːp)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (water, hole, wound) profondo (‑a)
    2. (snow) alto (‑a)
    the lake was 16 metres deep il lago era profondo 16 metri
    how deep is the water? quanto è profonda l'acqua?
    knee-deep in water in acqua fino alle ginocchia
    we were ankle-deep in mud il fango ci arrivava alle caviglie
    to be in deep water (figurative) navigare in cattive acque
    the deep end (of swimming pool) la parte più profonda
    to be thrown in (at) the deep end (figurative, informal) avere il battesimo del fuoco
    to go off (at) the deep end (figurative, informal, angry) partire per la tangente
    1. (shelf, cupboard) profondo (‑a)
    2. (border, hem) lungo (‑a)
    these kitchen units are 30 cm deep questi mobili da cucina hanno una profondità di 30 cm
  1. (voice, sigh) profondo (‑a)
    deep breathing exercises esercizi mpl respiratori
    he took a deep breath fece un respiro profondo
    1. (feeling, sleep, writer, insight) profondo (‑a)
    2. (colour) intenso (‑a), cupo (‑a)
    3. (relief) immenso (‑a)
    4. (interest, concern) vivo (‑a)
    to be deep in thought/in a book essere immerso (‑a) nei propri pensieri/nella lettura

adverb

  1. deep in her heart in fondo al cuore
    the spectators were standing 6 deep c'erano 6 file di spettatori in piedi
    don't go in too deep if you can't swim non andare nell'acqua alta se non sai nuotare
    to dig deep scavare in profondità
    deep in the forest nel cuore della foresta
    deep into the night fino a tarda notte
    to be deep in debt essere nei debiti fino al collo
    buried deep in snow coperto (‑a) da uno spesso strato di neve

noun

  1. the deep (literary) il mare

Example Sentences Including 'deep'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
There is a deep sense of unease about the future.
The Times Literary Supplement (2011)
In the hidden reaches where memory probes are sorrows too deep to fathom.
Amanda Mackenzie Stuart Consuelo & Alva: Love and Power in the Gilded Age (2005)
The deepest mines are four kilometres underground.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
It does cut deep that no one will get to see the real me.
The Sun (2016)
No one could doubt their deep love for one another.
The Sun (2011)
Petrol blue or deep claret will brighten the skin.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Set deep in space in the distant future, only two humans remain.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Showing belief in a partner will lead to a deeper commitment.
The Sun (2009)
Take a deep breath and just go with it as you join the busy traffic.
The Sun (2017)
There are love surprises when you discover how deep feelings now go.
The Sun (2013)
This room has two deep window seats below the tall windows in the front and side walls.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
To probe a world as alien as the deep also takes sensitivity.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
We are borrowing the billions we give away and so are just getting deeper and deeper in debt.
The Sun (2017)
Yet I feel a deep sense of being unfulfilled.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
He was a deep shade of green.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
The graphic shows the back four sitting deep in a 4-1-4-1.
The Sun (2016)
Because we lived in different countries, there was a year or two of deep anxiety.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It spoke to their long and deep taste for cruelty.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
The feeling of betrayal goes far deeper.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
He was deep in debt and facing ruin.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
The history goes a lot deeper and further back than those three and a half years.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
The one where you use drop caps, sometimes up to ten lines deep.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Yet there seems to be something deeper at work here.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
You might play it cool in a love bond but deep down you long for something more settled.
The Sun (2016)
Your deeper understanding of a partner could upgrade your love life.
The Sun (2008)
How much deeper are the anxieties of millions of my fellow citizens?
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
The Quins squad is relatively deep, with good cover in the back row.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
The deep sea has almost no light and very low temperatures.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
We have to begin further back and deeper in.
Christianity Today (2000)
Love led to activity in four areas buried deep within the older parts of the brain.
Claudia Hammond EMOTIONAL ROLLERCOASTER: A Journey Through the Science of Feelings (2005)
Take another deep breath and imagine the colour violet as you breathe out.
Vera Peiffer POSITIVE THINKING: Everything you have always known about positive thinking but were afraid to put into practice (2001)

deft

(dɛft)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. abile, destro (‑a)

Example Sentences Including 'deft'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
Her deft handling of the crisis prompted Fortune magazine this month to name her the most powerful woman in business.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
And maybe with a wry, intelligent eye and deft hand, it might have been.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
So, too, do the sanitary pioneers she tracks down and whose characters she wryly sketches with a few deft flicks of the pen.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
The 32-year-old proves just as deft in his handling of contemporary concerns.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
He made deft contributions with hand and foot and was instrumental in five of the tries.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
The Brazilian met it with a deft, flicked header.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Then there were the two deft passes that set up Ireland's second and fourth tries.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
A deft flick of the switch and my virtual French nurse vanishes into the ether.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Getting this right will require deft handling and we look forward to seeing the detail of the Government's approach.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
He played a deft hand.
The Sun (2012)
It will require strong leadership, deft footwork - and a united government.
The Sun (2009)
There could have been a big problem here but thanks to some deft footwork by the Panel, it is not.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
But this power is harnessed to their speed, handling skills and deft footwork.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)

dull

(dʌl)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (boring)
    1. (book, evening) noioso (‑a)
    2. (person, style) insulso (‑a)
    he's nice, but a bit dull è simpatico, ma un po' noioso
    as dull as ditchwater una vera pizza
    1. (dim, colour, eyes) spento (‑a)
    2. (metal) opaco (‑a)
    3. (overcast, weather, day, sky) cupo (‑a), scuro (‑a), fosco (‑a)
    4. (muffled, sound, pain, thud) sordo (‑a)
    5. (business, trade, business) stagnante
    6. (lacking spirit, person, mood) svogliato (‑a)
    7. (blade) smussato (‑a)
    a dull day una giornata nuvolosa
    1. (sight, hearing) debole
    2. (slow-witted)
      1. (person, mind) ottuso (‑a)
      2. (pupil) lento (‑a)

transitive verb

    1. (mind, senses) ottundere, annebbiare
    2. (blade) smussare
    3. (impression, memory) offuscare
    4. (pleasure, pain, grief) attenuare, attutire
    5. (sound, colour) smorzare
    6. (metal) rendere opaco (‑a)

Example Sentences Including 'dull'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
The weather was dull so he said we'd better wait a while to see if it got any better.
Joan Rice Sand In My Shoes: Wartime Diaries of a WAAF (2006)
These practices will not make dull jobs and dull people interesting.
Peter F. Drucker MANAGEMENT: task, responsibilities, practices (1974)
They are betting that monetary policy will go back to being rather dull.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Her ability to make a dull subject interesting makes her stand out.
Computing (2010)
A dull ache or sharp pain in this area?
The Sun (2017)
But after a while, the same old things can become a bit dull.
The Sun (2016)
If you thought weather systems were dull, this is the man to set you right.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
It was seen as dull and boring.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Q I have a rather dull granite kitchen worktop.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The result is a dull ache in your chest which may spread to your jaw or left arm.
The Sun (2012)
Their bright red beak and legs will also get a bit duller.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
There's barely a dull moment.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
This may on the face of it sound a little dull.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We're that splash of colour in a dull world of grey.
The Sun (2016)
Which is not to suggest for a minute that his show was by any means dull.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Your attitude to love is more practical, which may sound dull, but helps you to build a partnership that will fulfil your dreams with some interesting twists.
The Sun (2016)
As when he plays, rarely a dull moment.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
THERE is seldom a dull moment these days at the Vitality.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
British publishers just could not see any future for a book in which something as dull as regional French food played a significant part.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
It was a very dull and grey colour behind the gold.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Sounds pretty dull but this is what it would mean if Mrs May gives it the nod.
The Sun (2017)
Tell your wife you love her but your relationship has become dull.
The Sun (2016)
The show would be pretty dull if both families were identical.
The Sun (2006)
This country drama has become rather dull with too much emphasis on the older characters.
The Sun (2008)
This issue sounds dull but is vital to free speech.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
It's kind of grown dull and slow and boring.
Christianity Today (2000)

dumb

(dʌm)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (medicine) muto (‑a)
    2. (with surprise) senza parole, ammutolito (‑a)
    a dumb person un (a) muto (‑a)
    deaf and dumb sordomuto
    dumb animals gli animali
    to be struck dumb (figurative) restare senza parole, ammutolire
  1. (informal, stupid) stupido (‑a)
    I was so dumb! che stupido sono stato!
    that was a really dumb thing I did! ho fatto proprio una stupidaggine!
    to act dumb fare lo gnorri
    a dumb blonde una bionda svampita

faint

(feɪnt)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (smell, breeze, trace) leggero (‑a)
    2. (outline, mark) indistinto (‑a)
    3. (sound, voice) fievole, debole
    4. (hope) debole
    5. (idea, recollection, resemblance) vago (‑a)
    to feel faint sentirsi svenire
    I haven't the faintest (idea) (informal) non ne ho la più pallida idea
    faint with hunger debole per la fame
    his voice was very faint la sua voce era molto debole

noun

  1. svenimento

intransitive verb

  1. to faint (from) svenire (da)

Example Sentences Including 'faint'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
When the writing is at its most mundane we feel faint biblical echoes in the background.
The Times Literary Supplement (2014)
Most would agree that the spuds would carry the faint whiff of moral complicity.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Beech trees are showing the first faint signs of spring.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
I became faint and weak.
The Sun (2016)
The sudden change of focus gave me a moment's faint nausea.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
What to say I'm feeling a little faint.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Her face had a little faint colour in it, and the very exhaustion after the examination gave it a peaceful look.
Elizabeth Gaskell North and South (1855)
There's a scratching noise and your voice is so faint.
Len Deighton Bomber (2006 (1970))
Typically, apart from faint nausea, the drug has not the slightest effect on me.
various & introduction by Deirdre Chapman A Roomful of Birds - Scottish short stories 1990 (1990)
For the first time, all the European nations can look at these fixtures not with faint hope but with proper expectation.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
There was one faint hope that they would see the light.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
I almost fainted with shock!
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
I become dizzy and faint when I walk past them because the urge to knock them over is so unbelievably strong.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Not for the faint of heart, but ridiculously cheap.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
To catch and carry out those who fainted in the heat.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
It is a faint hope.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
None of us had the faintest idea what was about to take place.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
One volunteer fainted when they discovered a body.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
There may also be the faint patter of drizzle on canvas.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
This is no time for faint hearts.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Such things have a faint whiff of murder.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
This list is not for the faint of heart.
Christianity Today (2000)

fair 1

(fɛəʳ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (person, decision etc) giusto (‑a), equo (‑a)
    2. (hearing) imparziale
    3. (sample) rappresentativo (‑a)
    4. (fight, competition, match) leale
    it's/that's not fair! non è giusto!
    to be fair (to her) ... per essere giusti (nei suoi confronti)...
    it's only fair that ... è più che giusto che...
    it's fair to say that ... bisogna riconoscere che...
    fair enough! d'accordo!, va bene!
    by fair means or foul con ogni mezzo
    his fair share of la sua buona parte di
  1. (reasonable, average, work, result) discreto (‑a)
    he has a fair chance or hope of success ha buone probabilità di riuscire
    I have a fair chance of winning ho discrete probabilità di vincere
  2. (quite large)
    1. (sum) discreto (‑a), bello (‑a), considerevole
    2. (speed, pace) buono (‑a)
    a fair amount of un bel po' di
    that's a fair distance è una bella distanza
  3. (light-coloured)
    1. (hair, person) biondo (‑a)
    2. (complexion, skin) chiaro (‑a)
    people with fair skin le persone con la pelle chiara
  4. (fine, weather) bello (‑a)

adverb

  1. to play fair giocare correttamente
    to act/win fair and square agire/vincere onestamente
    the ball hit me fair and square in the face la palla mi ha colpito in piena faccia

Example Sentences Including 'fair'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
Her skin was as fair as the skin of young deer in the wilderness.
Clerk, Jayana & Siegel, Ruth Modern Literatures of the Non-Western World: Where the Waters Are Born (1995)
Less often considered is the fact that the imperial critique was a fair one.
The Times Literary Supplement (2013)
It is a fair question as to how one can base a political practice on such thoughts.
Boyne, Roy Foucault and Derrida - The Other Side Of Reason (1990)
Actually, that's not quite fair.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It would make it fair for the people who have grafted all their life and paid in.
The Sun (2009)
She also added a fair bit of other stuff that wouldn't do well on notebooks.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The general view is that things are now just a little bit fairer.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Then it is fair enough to be branded a socialite.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
There is a fun fair and entertainment for all the family.
The Sun (2012)
Your bargaining skills are turned on but ensuring a deal is fair also makes it lucky.
The Sun (2016)
Your firm but always fair approach gets good results.
The Sun (2013)
I have spent a fair amount of time on all that.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It's about giving people a fair chance.
The Sun (2017)
It's fair to say we got well and truly hammered last night.
The Sun (2017)
Things would be so much easier and fairer with a tweak to his terms of reference.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Which to me seems fair enough.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Age is no barrier to being tried as long as the trial is fair and the evidence is clear.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It also wants to double the amount of UK food it sells and increase fair trade products.
The Sun (2011)
It could be a country fair or a public school open day.
The Sun (2012)
It is fair to say that his players will not be sticking their win bonuses on it.
The Sun (2008)
They are now demanding a fairer share of the catch.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
This opened the way for really quite free and fair elections.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
To be fair though after years of instability that's not a bad place to be.
The Sun (2007)
We came here thinking he had a really solid place chance but he has won fair and square.
The Sun (2012)
We feel we both have a fair deal.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
What matters is that government should feel fair and that the country should be comfortable with it.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
You need to be fair both ways.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
But the rulings are fair and just.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
It is a fair question.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
Just a howl of 'It 's not fair.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
That is fair, just and manifestly necessary.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
His golden skin and fair hair were artfully set off by the theatrical costume.
Eddison, Sydney A Patchwork Garden: Unexpected Pleasures from a Country Garden (1990)

fast 1

(fɑːst)
Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est

adjective

    1. (speedy) veloce, svelto (‑a), rapido (‑a)
    2. (film) ad alta sensibilità
    fast train rapido
    a fast car una macchina veloce
    he's a fast worker (figurative) non perde certo tempo
    to pull a fast one on sb (informal) giocare un brutto tiro a qn
  1. (clock)
    to be fast andare avanti
    my watch is 5 minutes fast il mio orologio va avanti di 5 minuti
  2. (dissipated)
    1. (woman) dissoluto (‑a)
    2. (life) dissipato (‑a), dissoluto (‑a)
  3. (firm)
    1. (friend) devoto (‑a), fedele
    2. (colour, dye) resistente, che non stinge
    to make a boat fast (British) ormeggiare una barca

adverb

  1. (quickly) in fretta, velocemente, rapidamente
    to drive too fast correre troppo
    as fast as I can più in fretta possibile
    he ran off as fast as his legs would carry him è corso via come il vento or più veloce che poteva
    how fast can you type? a che velocità scrivi a macchina?
    not so fast! piano!
    the rain was falling fast pioveva forte or a dirotto
  2. (firmly, stuck, held) saldamente, bene
    tie it fast legalo bene
    it's stuck fast (door) è saldamente bloccato (nail, screw) è completamente incastrato
    fast asleep profondamente addormentato (‑a)

Example Sentences Including 'fast'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
It just needs to be tended to and tended to fast enough.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
Oman's gentleness can make your home country feel a bit fast and loose.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Sometimes we get pangs for a return to the fast pace of life.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
The language drifts round and about fast by the day.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
There is no reason to be rigid with intermittent fasting either.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Fast forward to this weekend and there was real aggravation in the dressing room.
The Sun (2012)
He is at his best in big fields with a fast pace.
The Sun (2016)
He talks, walks and eats fast and is neat to a fault.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Many of her rivals had facial hair and astonishingly fast times.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
No certainty there of a fast surface.
The Sun (2009)
The questions came thick and fast and they concerned only one man.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
They are one of a number of teams who play fast football.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We have moved fast in a short space of time.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Walk fast enough to increase your breathing but not so you get out of breath.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Average wages are growing almost three times as fast.
The Sun (2016)
The country has one of the fastest growing economies in Africa.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The tip just got away with the fast ground there and will enjoy these conditions.
The Sun (2008)
The very slow and very fast drivers are the most dangerous.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
They could be the fastest on the field while running in a straight line.
The Sun (2011)
This emergency trigger would allow them to literally pull a fast one.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
This is a beast that mainly exists, of course, while the rest of the country is fast asleep.
The Sun (2017)
Time to restore polish is fast running out.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Too hot and it goes off too fast.
The Sun (2017)
Who gets sick driving fast and presents a car show?
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Workers were delivering an outdoor chiller unit to the fast food restaurant when the vehicle toppled over.
The Sun (2013)
You have smaller odds of it going fast than if you plump for either of the others.
The Sun (2015)
The deacons called on the church council to join in prayer and fasting.
Christianity Today (2000)
Virtually anything is possible if you hold fast to a dream.
Austin, Valerie Self-Hypnosis (1994)
You can be fast asleep all night and still wake up tense and sore.
Hambly, Dr Kenneth Banish Anxiety - how to stop worrying and take charge of your life (1991)
They have pulled away fast in periods of growth to be followed by the other regions.
Forrest, Ray & Murie, Alan & Williams, Peter Home-ownership - differentiation and fragmentation (1990)

feeble

(ˈfiːbl)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (gen) debole
    2. (joke) pietoso (‑a)
    3. (informal, person) rammollito (‑a)

Example Sentences Including 'feeble'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
A1 per cent rise in underlying sales might seem rather feeble from a company that usually grows four times as quickly.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
The productivity performance he has inherited is particularly feeble.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The ending is particularly feeble.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
This is a feeble argument.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
This is a feeble effort.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We were left with a rather tame and feeble story about film production.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
She suddenly felt shy, when the little feeble light made them visible.
Elizabeth Gaskell North and South (1855)
Years went over, and the Giant grew very old and feeble.
Oscar Wilde The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888)
Derby toyed with City's feeble efforts in the second half and were content not to take chances.
The Sun (2012)
It was a feeble effort from Gloucester and it could have been worse.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
It was a feeble effort.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
Mostly they have failed, and in the search they have awarded the jersey to a large number of rather feeble performers.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Their feeble efforts this summer have added weight to the view that this tour should not have taken place.
The Sun (2009)
Our verdict: a feeble effort.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
She is still the sort of aunt who makes one feel rather feeble.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
But apparently we are too weak and feeble to survive on our own.
The Sun (2015)
By then there were so few home fans left that the boos which greeted the final whistle were weak and feeble.
The Sun (2008)
In the olden days you retired because you were simply too old and feeble to carry the coal to the surface any more.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
An unusually weak and feeble recovery?
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
The rather feeble explanation is that the promises would have taken longer to implement if they were extended to all brands.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)

few

(fjuː)

adjective, pronoun

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (not many) pochi (‑e)
    few books pochi libri
    he has few friends ha pochi amici
    few of them pochi di loro
    few (people) managed to do it pochi riuscirono a farlo
    few succeed pochi ci riescono
    she is one of the few (people) who ... è una delle poche persone che...
    the few who ... i pochi che...
    in or over the past few days in questi ultimi giorni, negli ultimi giorni
    in or over the next few days nei prossimi giorni
    every few days/months ogni due o tre giorni/mesi
    with few exceptions con or salvo poche eccezioni
    every few weeks a intervalli di qualche settimana
    they are few and far between sono rari
    there are very few of us or we are very few siamo pochi
    the last or remaining few minutes i pochi minuti che rimangono
    as few as three of them solo tre di loro
    too few troppo pochi
    there were three too few ne mancavano tre
  2. (some, several)
    a few alcuni (‑e), qualche
    a few books alcuni libri, qualche libro
    I invited a few old friends ho invitato alcuni vecchi amici
    I know a few ne conosco alcuni
    a few of them alcuni di loro
    a few more days qualche altro giorno
    in a few more days fra qualche giorno
    a good few or quite a few parecchi
    a good few or quite a few books parecchi libri, un bel po' di libri
    quite a few people un bel po' di gente
    a good few or quite a few (people) came è venuta un bel po' di gente

Example Sentences Including 'few'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
Demand for this style of investment has grown considerably in the past few years.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It is set to close a further three acquisitions in the next few months.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
With few hard numbers to go on, investors have to rely on guesswork and emotion.
John Cassidy DOT.CON (2001)
Get those last few away to the compost heap or tucked up under shrubs.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Lower heat and simmer for a few minutes.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Only a few days left of our least favourite month.
The Sun (2013)
The show is set to be piloted in the next few weeks.
The Sun (2009)
There are a few good laughs here.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
They are now expected within the next few weeks.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
They keep plaque at bay and brighten teeth after a few uses.
The Sun (2009)
We captured a few small ones and took samples from them and then put them back.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
You will need to appoint a few people as executors of your will.
The Sun (2016)
Home celebrations began with the last few singles still out on the course.
The Sun (2016)
They have certainly earned these last few weeks of unbelievable memories.
The Sun (2016)
But crunch a few numbers and things get more interesting.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
She lives a few hundred yards away from my flat.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
They were just a few feet away.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
You could save a few pounds in a few seconds.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Claims that such systems make pets anxious and scared mean few owners use them.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It is understood the five men were all recalled into custody within the past few months.
The Sun (2009)
Probably for a good few years yet.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
She appears to have had few close friends.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
She would stop for a few seconds and then bite again.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The arrangement lasted only a few weeks.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
The reaction was similar to the one when we found remains a few days ago.
The Sun (2008)
They are then asked questions by people they have only seen before for a few seconds.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Very few people are instinctively good at maths.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
The faces grow older, the numbers are fewer and the memories fade.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The police have suffered a good deal of criticism in the past few years.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
You need to pay fewer people more.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
They felt he allowed few opportunities to use their abilities.
Christianity Today (2000)
Only a few people close to me have had anything happen.
Stanko, Elizabeth Everyday Violence (1990)
There may be a few small acne scars from adolescence.
Brumberg, Elaine Take Care of Your Skin (1990)

fierce

(fɪəs)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (gen) feroce
    2. (opponent) accanito (‑a)
    3. (enemy) acerrimo (‑a)
    4. (look, fighting) fiero (‑a)
    5. (wind, storm) furioso (‑a)
    6. (heat) intenso (‑a)
    a fierce Alsatian un feroce cane lupo
    there's fierce competition between companies c'è una concorrenza spietata tra società
    a fierce attack un violento attacco

Example Sentences Including 'fierce'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
There were fierce little battles as companies of the two battle groups worked side by side in the last stages of the process.
Richard Holmes Dusty Warriors: Modern Soldiers at War (2006)
For fierce footwear look no further that the leopard print pumps.
The Sun (2013)
I often say gorillas are like that: big and look very fierce and very strong but actually are quite gentle and sensitive.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Northern France was battered by a fierce storm yesterday.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
Strong brows complement this fierce eye look.
The Sun (2015)
The celebs got a soaking when a fierce storm hit the camp as they made dinner.
The Sun (2011)
Their rivalry is fierce but loyalty is second to none.
The Sun (2014)
There is something about very small and very fierce that always gets to people.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
They are fierce competitors, always have been and always will be.
The Sun (2009)
It's always fierce and a game with that bit of edge to it.
The Sun (2016)
Those who make it possess superlative skill and fierce competitive will.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
He wants her to look fierce.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
But the competition is fierce.
The Sun (2016)
Competition has been fierce, with 243 writers submitting their works.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Foxes would also benefit from the removal of a fiercer and stronger competitor with the same diet.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
His fierce looks stem from his fur pattern, she explained.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
His fierce loyalty to his lead actor is understandable.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Is he always a fierce competitor?
The Sun (2006)
It is astonishing to see these tiny birds engaged in such a fierce aerial battle.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
It knows there are fiercer fights to come.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
It's another fierce and highly competitive week.
The Sun (2006)
That fierce sense of loyalty you feel for each other.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
The fierce competition seen on the high streets caps a challenging year for the retail sector.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
The scene is set for a fierce legal battle.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
There is little job security and competition is fierce.
The Sun (2008)
He was a steady golfer; affable but with a fierce competitive streak.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)

firm 1

(ˈfɜːm)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (gen) solido (‑a)
    2. (steady) saldo (‑a)
    3. (belief) fermo (‑a)
    4. (measures) severo (‑a)
    5. (look, voice) risoluto (‑a)
    6. (prices) stabile
    7. (offer, decision) definitivo (‑a)
    firm tomatoes pomodori non troppo maturi
    a firm mattress un materasso rigido
    a firm grip una presa salda
    a firm refusal un netto rifiuto
    as firm as a rock solido (‑a) come una roccia
    to be a firm believer in sth credere fermamente in qc
    to be firm with sb essere deciso (‑a) con qn
    they are firm friends sono molto amici
    to keep a firm hold on tenere saldamente
    to be on firm ground (figurative) andare sul sicuro
    to stand firm or take a firm stand over sth (figurative) tener duro per quanto riguarda qc
firm is not translated by the Italian word firma

Example Sentences Including 'firm'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
They must be firm favourites now to win the Championship.
Moynihan, John Kevin Keegan - Black and White (1993)
Increasingly, the boundaries of competitiveness are controlled by firms that run international production networks.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Much of the firm's business was drawn from the local furniture industry.
Tom Cannon Basic Marketing. Principles and Practice (1986)
The current study makes use of employment statistics for establishments rather than firms or enterprises.
Forstner, Helmut, Ballance, Robert Competing in a Global Economy (1990)
The firms pay a joining fee and a percentage of any sales they make.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
The notion of job security at big law firms is unlikely to endure.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
The survey found that profits and business volumes at big financial services firms continue to plummet.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
They also could use the knowledge they have about firms and their competitors.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
This can include family members and other firms you control.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Uncertainty also makes firms more likely to employ temporary workers rather than take on new permanent staff.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Your firm will also need to consider the specific needs of vulnerable consumers.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Do you have a service for firms that do not want to invest in all that new equipment?
Computing (2010)
After all, the staff own a quarter of the specialist financial services firm.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Firm in your belief that the sheep can be herded somewhere else instead.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It is also wider than it is tall, which gives it a classic Japanese feel and makes it a firm favourite.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The batter should have a fairly firm consistency.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
The best information is often supplied by car hire firms when you collect your vehicle.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
They are about getting into arguments in languages you can't speak with car rental firms.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
This recipe was a firm favourite with me and my brothers when we were growing up, and now I often cook it for myself.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
Two special awards recognise the challenges faced by large firms seeking to be green.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Such a firm grasp on the essential facts.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
The main reason this deal was done was the player wanted to play for us and held firm.
The Sun (2014)
We have a firm belief we can get out of this.
The Sun (2013)
American financial firm to run short of cash.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
But ask people whether they trust the independence of the big firms and the answer you will get tells you all you need to know.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The firm shut for business last month after it was stopped from claiming legal aid cash.
The Sun (2016)
The firm will also pay exit fees from previous suppliers.
The Sun (2016)
The research also includes islanders who have joined the boards of British firms in the past year.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Top of his list of targets were fat cat energy firms.
The Sun (2013)
Try to work for a global firm or company and work abroad as it is a great experience.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
You have a friendly but firm way of talking so people know you mean what you say.
The Sun (2009)
Will they keep their promises and stand firm when the going gets tough?
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Your muscles become firmer and more toned.
Christianity Today (2000)

fond

(fɒnd)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (loving, memory, look) affettuoso (‑a), tenero (‑a)
    2. (doting) che stravede
    3. (foolish, hope, desire) vano (‑a)
    to be fond of sb voler bene a qn
    she's fond of swimming le piace nuotare
    she's fond of dogs le piacciono i cani
fond is not translated by the Italian word fondo

Example Sentences Including 'fond'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
True she has always been fond of you.
Clerk, Jayana & Siegel, Ruth Modern Literatures of the Non-Western World: Where the Waters Are Born (1995)
It was not quite as fond as some imagined.
Simon Ball THE GUARDSMEN (2004)
He has been so kind and jolly that we all got quite fond of him.
Louisa May Alcott Little Women (1869)
They always had been fond of each other and they lived very happily as man and wife.
Johanna Spyri Heidi (1881)
Cats are particularly fond of playing with tinsel and this can be dangerous if swallowed.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Feeling almost fond, I read it.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
He may have his critics, but having that many fans bid you farewell like fond former lovers takes some doing.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
I feel terribly fond of penguins.
The Sun (2013)
It is a fond and forlorn hope.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
She said: 'I have fond memories of my time in the sky.
The Sun (2011)
This fond and foolish couple would have been safer buying each other underwear.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
What should have been a fond farewell turned into an endurance test.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Your naturally kind heart encourages you to make excuses for people you are fond of, especially if money is involved.
The Sun (2017)
He was especially fond of jazz and Cuban records.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
It remains a fond and vivid memory.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
At least, after yesterday, he has a fond and recent memory to relive during the long hours in court.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
I am especially fond of anything with a striped flower.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
I happen to be rather fond of them but public opinion runs strongly the other way.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
I have grown rather fond of the term and see it as a form of affection.
The Sun (2014)
She added: 'I have such fond memories of our time working together.
The Sun (2009)
That is the fond hope of the Republicans.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
The mice are particularly fond of us.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
They are particularly fond of the large cricket called the mole cricket.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
It is a fond hope that there is a magical number at which all those people hostile to immigration will suddenly change the habit of a lifetime.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
The fond public belief that all charities use money well doesn't bear too much examination.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
My father was fond of spruce trees.
Eddison, Sydney A Patchwork Garden: Unexpected Pleasures from a Country Garden (1990)

frail

(freɪl)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (person, health, structure) fragile, delicato (‑a)
    2. (figurative, hope, relationship) tenue, debole

Example Sentences Including 'frail'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
It has been parodied as the chosen transportation of frail old folk and smelly students.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
My mother is elderly and frail and does not have the stamina to pursue this.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
And yet one possibly very frail man continues to elude them.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
My elderly mother is increasingly frail and will soon no longer be able to live independently.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
She was already physically very frail.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
The implications of failing were that an old, frail and sick man who is full of honour and integrity would have been left without an effective remedy.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
The pop star had come to look increasingly frail and had long been erratic in his behaviour.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
You don't have to be frail or elderly to feel the growing dearth of public seating.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
His wife, a frail woman who did not share his intellectual enthusiasms, was a housewife.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Only the most vulnerable and frail and confused reside here.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
The nerve supply around these glands is frail and vulnerable to damage during exploration of the glands.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
He said that frail older people with physical and mental health problems were at particular risk of loneliness and isolation at this time of year.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
If frail older people get fewer care visits they are more likely to get ill and end up in hospital.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
In the worst hospitals, frail and fragile people were left to eat without assistance from the nursing or healthcare staff.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
It is frail, older people who will suffer unless the issue is resolved.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
She is very weak and frail at the moment.
The Sun (2010)
She's worried about her but is too old and frail to have her stay with her.
The Sun (2013)
Social care cuts mean that frail, elderly patients who have finished their treatment are stuck in hospital because they do not have help to return home.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The patient was so incredibly weak and frail when he came in.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
The problems are indicative of a sector struggling to give staff the skills to cope with increasingly frail residents.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
We have very many elderly and frail people that attend day care and some are diabetic.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
People looking after frail and vulnerable patients need to know what they are doing.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
How will this frail woman carry the dead weight of the body of a mature man?
Christianity Today (2000)
Women, it was said, were too physically and emotionally frail for the rough competition of politics.
Rotundo, E. Anthony American Manhood: Transformations in Masculinity from the Revolution to the Modern Era (1993)

frank 1

(fræŋk)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. franco (‑a), sincero (‑a), aperto (‑a)

Example Sentences Including 'frank'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
Often, the tone of the letters is disturbingly frank.
The Times Literary Supplement (2011)
He steadfastly rejected criticisms of the company, yet was less than frank in disclosure of his recent share dealings.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Most City people are refreshingly frank about and free of cant about what drives them into the office at 6am each day.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
We welcome an open and frank dialogue with them.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
DON'T you wish our politicians could be as frank and honest as this?
The Sun (2011)
Her letters are frank, witty and humorous.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
In this country we have a long history of free and frank exchange of opinions.
The Sun (2012)
That required the full and frank disclosure of all relevant facts and documents.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
That's why people are so frank in my show.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
The evidence suggested men were less frank in mixed groups.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
The spouse had a duty to the court to make full and frank disclosure of his resources.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
There are also two frank errors in the plot.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
There was then a frank exchange with his team over the radio.
The Sun (2016)
I am no longer completely frank with people in my constituency.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
There would no doubt be a frank exchange of views between us.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Ask your father to have a frank talk with your mother.
The Sun (2010)
He is happy to talk for ages and is open and frank with his views.
The Sun (2015)
I find him open, charming and fully prepared to give a frank assessment of his new self.
The Sun (2013)
I thought it was a frank and courageous speech.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
If appraisals are not honest and frank, they have no point.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
In many countries, the frank assessments of their weaknesses and foibles will be seen as tantamount to espionage.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
They are all guilty of being less than frank with the public.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
What is needed is full and frank information.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
So have a frank talk with your team about your expectations.
Christianity Today (2000)

fresh

(frɛʃ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (gen, not stale) fresco (‑a)
    2. (new)
      1. (sheet of paper, supplies, approach) nuovo (‑a)
      2. (news) recente
    is the fish fresh? il pesce è fresco?
    to put fresh courage into sb ridare coraggio a qn
    to make a fresh start ricominciare da capo
    as fresh as a daisy fresco (‑a) come una rosa
  1. (invigorating, breeze) fresco (‑a)
    it's a bit fresh (meteorology) fa un po' freschino
  2. (not salt, water) dolce
  3. (informal, cheeky) sfacciato (‑a)
    to get fresh with sb prendersi delle libertà con qn

adverb

  1. (baked, picked) appena, da poco
    bread fresh from the oven pane appena uscito dal forno
    to come fresh from New York essere arrivato (‑a) fresco (‑a) fresco (‑a) da New York
    a teacher fresh from college un insegnante appena uscito dall'università

Example Sentences Including 'fresh'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
It is more interesting to make a fresh purchase than to dispose of something you have held for a long time.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
It then helped you make a fresh claim against Epsom and Ewell.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The mind should be fresh and alert, the body relaxed.
Evans, Andrew The Secrets of Musical Confidence (1994)
For a totally fresh fruits de mer experience go to the little warehouse nearby.
The Sun (2016)
Her classes feel new and fresh and are verging on the addictive.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
In the hotel and most of the restaurants the food was both fresh and local.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
It might not look glamorous, but it will always be fresh and classic.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Not with antagonism, but through mercy, by winning people over to a fresh cast of mind.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
This provides warm but fresh air without having to open the windows in winter.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
This way it feels more fresh and alive.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Yet as a wartime document the exhibition feels fresh and alive.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
You can take a fresh look at home plans and get them on the move.
The Sun (2011)
You could replace the coriander with ginger by finely chopping an inch of fresh ginger and adding with the onion at the beginning.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
You have fresh ideas plus the cool confidence and stamina to put them into action.
The Sun (2011)
You have to keep moving on and introducing yourself to different instruments and fresh ideas.
The Sun (2016)
Your fresh ideas will revitalise a relationship.
The Sun (2013)
He runs well fresh and is fairly weighted.
The Sun (2014)
This campaign they remain a breath of fresh air due to the honesty of their manager.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
White with brights looks fresh and modern.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
The limited fresh fish range is supported by a solid frozen section.
Smith, Drew Food Watch (1994)
When you crave something sweet eat fresh fruit instead.
Holford, Patrick The Family Nutrition Workbook (1988)
You will see that the space given to ready meals frequently outstrips that given to fresh meat and fish combined.
Joanna Blythman SHOPPED: The Shocking Power of British Supermarkets (2004)
Her mind would remain fresh and attentive and her body would stay lean and alert with good muscle tone.
Whiteside, Dr Mike Banish Headaches -how to obtain fast, drug-free relief from headache (1990)
After a wet and windy night, westerly winds made much of the north and west brighter and fresher.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Bran flakes with skimmed milk topped with slices of fresh or canned peach.
The Sun (2006)
They also brought the fresh air of democracy.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
They always paid with fresh hundred rupee notes.
The Sun (2011)
We are all suffering from prickly heat and the insects and the lack of any fresh food.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Times are indeed adverse and a fresh look at the defence review would pay dividends.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
Wipe the fresh mushrooms clean and quarter.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
If there is a choice between using fresh vegetables and canned foods always choose the former.
Lashford, Stephanie The Residue Report - an action plan for safer food (1988)
Store fresh fruit and vegetables somewhere cool and dark.
Lamplugh, Diana & Sterwin, Diana & Nottidge, Pamela Survive the Nine to Five - a woman's guide to working well (1989)

full

(fʊl)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (gen) pieno (‑a)
    2. (vehicle, hotel) completo (‑a)
    3. (timetable) denso (‑a)
    the tank's full il serbatoio è pieno
    to be full of ... essere pieno (‑a) di...
    full of people gremito (‑a) di gente
    to be full of o.s. essere pieno (‑a) di sé
    we are full up for July siamo al completo per luglio
    he's had a full life ha avuto una vita piena or intensa
    I'm full (up) (informal) sono pieno or sazio
    1. (complete) completo (‑a)
      1. (member) effettivo (‑a)
      2. (price) intero (‑a)
    2. (details) ampio (‑a)
    to pay full fare pagare la tariffa intera or completa
    to fall full length cadere lungo (‑a) disteso (‑a)
    in full bloom in piena fioritura
    in full colour (illustration) a colori
    in full dress in abito da cerimonia
    army at full strength esercito al gran completo
    to be in full swing essere in pieno fervore
    in the fullest sense of the word nel pieno senso della parola
    at full speed a tutta velocità
    full speed ahead (nautical) avanti tutta
    full price prezzo intero
    the full particulars tutti i particolari
    full information tutte le informazioni
    I waited a full hour ho aspettato un'ora intera
  1. (rounded)
    1. (face) pieno (‑a)
    2. (figure) pienotto (‑a)
    3. (lips) carnoso (‑a)
    4. (skirt, sleeves) largo (‑a), ampio (‑a)

adverb

  1. to know full well that sapere benissimo che
    it hit him full in the face l'ha colpito in pieno viso

noun

  1. to write sth in full scrivere qc per intero
    to pay in full pagare tutto
    to the full fino in fondo, al massimo

Example Sentences Including 'full'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
But we did not address them until they hit us with full force.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Its two runways are full to capacity.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
We are sceptical consumers would choose to meet the cost of this programme given the full picture.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
You should also look at recruitment websites and make full use of contacts.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Everyone should have access to flexible working and make full use of the opportunity.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Love deepens when dreams are shared - and the full moon links love with a Gemini.
The Sun (2016)
The full moon says love needs trust to help it grow stronger.
The Sun (2012)
The full report of that taskforce will be published this week.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
The official figures do not reflect the full extent of the problem.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
They were swept into a grand room full of rich clutter and fine carpets.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
This enables all aircraft up to the Airbus A380 to land and take off with full load capacity during all weather conditions.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
This means they can make you feel full for longer.
The Sun (2011)
Time your visit around the full moon for best results.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
He is unable to walk and it could be a year before he makes a full recovery.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
The foreign entry is full of possible winners.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
To handle nerves and fix the game by full time is one thing.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Yet what did he expect when his own story was full of holes.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Her full contact details were listed.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
Stick one in your sandwich and feel fuller longer.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
The printed full skirt is a beautiful summer piece and the jersey dress is right for anywhere.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
The show is full of exactly that kind of bad behaviour.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The thing about getting up so early is that one is full of optimism.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We both know the park is full of scary people after dark.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
He cleans his teeth with his fingers and always talks with his mouth full.
The Sun (2008)
It was soon full of people eating lunch.
The Sun (2011)
Now the council has admitted its blunder and offered him a full refund.
The Sun (2011)
See the full story at timesonline.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
She offered a full refund and a bouquet as an apology.
The Sun (2016)
The biscuit tin is completely full of hair.
The Sun (2008)
They need to feel the full force of the law and public scrutiny along with it.
The Sun (2016)
Which then causes it to write a full stop.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Please go to our website for full details of how to lodge a complaint.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
I give her full credit for her determination.
Christianity Today (2000)

gay

(ɡeɪ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (homosexual) omosessuale, gay inv
    1. (literary, person) allegro (‑a), gaio (‑a)
    2. (colour) vivace, vivo (‑a)

noun

  1. (homosexual) gay m

grand

(ɡrænd)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (splendid, occasion, person) splendido (‑a), magnifico (‑a)
    2. (person, important) altolocato (‑a)
    3. (style, house) sontuoso (‑a), grandioso (‑a)
    4. (informal, very pleasant) eccezionale, stupendo (‑a)
    her house is very grand la sua casa è molto sontuosa
    we had a grand time ce la siamo proprio spassata

noun

  1. (informal) mille dollari mpl ( or sterline fpl)
grand is not translated by the Italian word grande

Example Sentences Including 'grand'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
The empire was not the product of a grand design.
The Times Literary Supplement (2010)
But the charity is absolutely right to turn down this ten grand.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
He still has the grand piano that he had when we were growing up.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Repair will cost over a grand.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
The grandest monuments are still of imperial vintage.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
This is a fine restoration and reuse of a grand building.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
And you have played a grand total of zero minutes of league football this year.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
He is a green jacket away from being only the sixth man in history to complete the career grand slam.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It would have cost five grand.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
New Zealand completed a grand slam of victories over the home unions four months ago.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
This is probably the biggest match of the season next to the final of a grand slam.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
We want to protect the festive nature of the grand prix.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Yesterday the only thing grand was the final whistle.
The Sun (2010)
What do you call a collection of grand old residences?
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
He had lost two consecutive sets and looked like losing his fifth grand slam final.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Just think what you could do with a whopping ten grand.
The Sun (2008)
One grand prix of the season in Melbourne yesterday with sublime ease.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
So the language is likely to be less grand.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Such is the grand design, the plan of campaign.
Eccleshall, Robert English Conservatism since the Restoration: An introduction and anthology (1990)
That six grand would have been recouped within ten seconds of the fine being imposed.
The Sun (2009)
The skeletons of grand buildings haunt the graveyard that once was a bustling neighbourhood.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
This is a bargain at less than two grand.
The Sun (2016)
There are many times when six grand looks like a lot of money.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
He certainly raises many grand questions that get lightly addressed or go unanswered.
Christianity Today (2000)

great

(ɡreɪt)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (gen) grande
    2. (pain, heat) forte, intenso (‑a)
    3. (care etc) molto (‑a)
    4. (age) venerando (‑a)
    they're great friends sono grandi amici
    he was in great pain soffriva molto
    it's of no great importance non ha molta importanza
    he took great care to explain clearly si è impegnato per spiegare in modo chiaro
    he's a great reader è un lettore accanito
    a great oak tree una grande quercia
    great big (informal) enorme
    a great many moltissimi
    Alexander the Great Alessandro Magno or il Grande
    you're a great one for arriving at the wrong moment! (informal) sei speciale per arrivare al momento sbagliato!
    the great thing is that ... il bello è che...
    great Scott! (informal) perbacco!
  1. (informal, excellent) meraviglioso (‑a), magnifico (‑a), favoloso (‑a)
    it was great! è stato fantastico!
    he's great at football nel calcio è una cannonata
    he's great on jazz sa tutto sul jazz
    we had a great time ci siamo divertiti un mondo
    you look great hai un aspetto splendido
    you look great in that outfit quel completo ti sta benissimo

Example Sentences Including 'great'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
You may also need to move quickly if you wish to secure a great deal.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
He said: 'It would be great to see her win one of them'
The Sun (2010)
Let's go make something great!
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
So often one great performance will overwhelm the rest.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
The controls clearly show which speed is suitable for which task, with a great number and variety of options.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The island is also renowned as the great white shark capital of Australia.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
To take up this great offer go to our website.
The Sun (2014)
To work with that group of people has been great.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Which is not to say the great gutting was unnecessary.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
While they are big in area, many of the great modern reservoirs can be disappointing for birds.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Why are empty bottles and pools of vomit the decor of so much great literature?
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
That you say you have something of great importance to our cause.
Iain Gale Man of Honour (2007)
And it does not get a great deal worse than this.
The Sun (2017)
He is quick and skilful, he has great and scores tries.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
He said: 'It was a great day.
The Sun (2016)
One of the great modern managerial careers now hinges on a long shot.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
So how do they match up against the all-time greats?
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
So just to be back at Wembley again is great.
The Sun (2010)
Social media is great but people voice their opinions in the wrong way sometimes.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The Olympics would have been good but not great.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
The guys behind the scenes are doing a great job.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
She also had great taste in music.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Then you notice the whacking great big lighthouse back left.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
We feel great sadness when a person dies or is hurt on our land.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Being on the ocean was another of her great pleasures.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
IT has been a sad year for music with many all-time greats passing away.
The Sun (2016)
It was my first time but she made me feel great.
The Sun (2017)
Jumping in the ocean is one of the great joys in my life.
The Sun (2016)
My free leaflet on how to get a great social life is full of ideas.
The Sun (2006)
She said:'I will say it is great to have a woman in charge of the country.
The Sun (2016)
Some of these new services have great views from the top deck.
The Sun (2013)
Washington has to recognise that it needs a great deal of help.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
We beat the greats of cinema.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
We made a renewed commitment to use great works of art in our own ministry back home.
Christianity Today (2000)
There are a great number of exercise ideas to choose from.
Vera Peiffer POSITIVELY FEARLESS: Breaking free of the fears that hold you back (2001)

green

(ɡriːn)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (colour) (also politics) verde
    2. (unripe) acerbo (‑a), verde
    3. (inexperienced) alle prime armi, inesperto (‑a)
    4. (gullible) ingenuo (‑a)
    a green car una macchina verde
    dark green verde scuro
    to have green fingers or (US) to have a green thumb (figurative) avere il pollice verde
    to turn green (figurative)
    1. (with nausea) sbiancare
    2. (with envy) diventare verde
    I'm not as green as I look! (figurative, informal) non sono mica nato ieri!
    green salad insalata verde

noun

    1. (colour) verde m
    2. (grassy area) prato, spiazzo erboso
    3. (bowling green) campo da bocce
    4. (of golf course) green m inv
    5. (also village green) ≈ piazza del paese
    greens plural noun (cookery) verdura sing
  1. (politics)
    the Greens i verdi

Example Sentences Including 'green'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
Most homes could take some simple steps to make them greener.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
So you can cut the amount of tax by driving a greener car.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Also available in green, blue and white.
The Sun (2016)
Also avoid using green ones - especially as baked potatoes.
The Sun (2016)
Light and fresh with hints of moreish green apple and pale peppers.
The Sun (2016)
Pick the green tops off the tomatoes.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
The uranium gives it a yellow or green colour and makes it glow under ultraviolet light.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
These will soon become little green whisks.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
This bean stew is tasty enough to enjoy on its own or with fresh green beans.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
This combination of food is very good with spinach or British green beans.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
We cannot face one more cup of green tea or choke down any more oily fish.
The Sun (2012)
We know that green spaces promote wellbeing.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Young staff also want offices with green space.
The Sun (2013)
The green and red panel lamps came alight.
Len Deighton Bomber (2006 (1970))
It was straight from the village green.
The Sun (2013)
Probably the trickiest green on the course.
The Sun (2009)
Then they went to the chipping green and he holed two of his first three attempts.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
I have had two green cars, both of which were soon covered in dents.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Sprinkle with parmesan and serve with green beans.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
It felt like being on a boat on a dark green ocean.
Joanna Blythman SHOPPED: The Shocking Power of British Supermarkets (2004)
Many growers produced few or none of the pale green olives.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Or they might put green dye in his laundry.
The Sun (2013)
Serve the chops with boiled potatoes and green beans.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Suddenly they spotted a group of blue and green lights piercing through the fog.
The Sun (2008)
That's another reason why fellow golfers are green with envy.
The Sun (2016)
The gills are white and the cap is usually a pale green colour.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The new growth is bright green compared with the old dark green growth.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
There was no mention of the land being green belt.
The Sun (2011)
All of them inflamed with the force that through the green fuse drives the flower.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
How to square the green belt circle?
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
That is why in certain circumstances we have endorsed building on green belt land near cities.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
You can be green with envy or blue with sadness.
Christianity Today (2000)
Nobody thought that green people could say anything worth listening to.
Goshgarian, Gary Exploring language (6th edn) (1995)

grey

(ɡreɪ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. grigio (‑a)
    1. (complexion) smorto (‑a)
    2. (outlook, prospect) poco roseo (‑a)
    a grey suit un completo grigio
    to go grey diventar grigio (‑a), ingrigirsi
    to go grey with fear (person) sbiancarsi in viso dalla paura
    grey skies cielo grigio

noun

  1. (colour) grigio

intransitive verb

  1. (hair) diventare grigio (‑a)

Example Sentences Including 'grey'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
PS The festivities may be drawing to a close but there is still time to banish hangovers and get those grey cells working in my seasonal quiz.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
One day they sold him an old grey horse starved of life.
Max Arthur Lost Voices of the Edwardians: 1901–1910 in the words of the Men & Women Who Were There (2006)
All the extras have grey hair and a thick crust of spores and fungal matter on their face.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
And the only one without grey hair.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Dark grey is the most frequent choice.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Everything is a little bit grey.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
I rode a beautiful grey horse around the set.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The hair then looks grey because of the way that it absorbs light.
The Sun (2012)
The weather changed quite dramatically last week when a sunny day turned dull and grey.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Their clothes had become grey with washing.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Then that golden coach, pulled by eight grey horses.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
There is also a link between the condition and men with grey hair and dark eyebrows.
The Sun (2015)
These cheerful mini shoppers caught our eye on a miserable grey day on the high street.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Watched a compact man in a grey suit get out and walk north.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Well, the combination of grey suit and peroxide hair has decided it for me.
The Sun (2009)
We all got into the grey car.
various & introduction by Deirdre Chapman A Roomful of Birds - Scottish short stories 1990 (1990)
Now he laps the dark grey cars.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
The law needs to be changed as there are grey areas.
The Sun (2016)
There is no grey area when we train.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The furniture and lighting are in greys and chrome.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
The sky turned grey and the conversation turned into a job interview.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
This will avoid turning them a lighter grey.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
We love thee for adding a little grey eye shadow to make things look more swish and modern.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
It was a very dull and grey colour behind the gold.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
One of them was a grey colour in the face.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Puddings are a small pleasure in a sea of grey days, one of those things that make it bearable.
The Sun (2016)
The result is a thought provoking, super interesting read, guaranteed to get the grey matter working.
The Sun (2016)
Those with grey bedrooms typically get lucky around 1.8 times a week.
The Sun (2014)
Trying to guess the villain makes our grey matter forge new neural connections.
The Sun (2010)
We will paint a nice dull grey to keep our neighbors happy!
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Winter blues At this time of year I yearn for something to light up the grey.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It was a grey and rainy day in Sheffield.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
This left a grey area in which common sense might be applied.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)

gross

(ɡrəʊs)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (fat, body) obeso (‑a)
    2. (vegetation) lussureggiante
    3. (behaviour, language, error) grossolano (‑a)
    4. (impertinence) sfacciato (‑a)
    it was really gross! è stato veramente disgustoso!
    1. (total, profit, income) complessivo (‑a), totale
    2. (business, weight, income) lordo (‑a)
    gross interest interesse m lordo
    £10,000 gross 10.000 sterline lorde

noun (invariable)

  1. (twelve dozen) grossa

transitive verb

  1. (business) incassare, avere un incasso lordo di
gross is not translated by the Italian word grosso

Example Sentences Including 'gross'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
Examples are first of the college lecturer who was convicted of gross indecency in a public lavatory with another man.
Torrington, Derek Personnel Management: A New Approach (1991)
It is possible to make charitable donations from your gross pay before income tax has been deducted.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Its debt has doubled to a huge 195% of gross domestic product since then.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Next also impressed with the way in which it widened gross margins on the retail side.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
The ruling of gross negligence is the most serious possible outcome.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Investments and income can be paid gross of tax and in the currency of your choice.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
The gross domestic product of most industrial countries dropped by about 30 per cent.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Although it's safe to smell it really is quite gross.
The Sun (2012)
Britain's budget deficit peaked at under 11% of gross domestic product.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
His actions led to him being fired last year for gross misconduct.
The Sun (2011)
It pays a 15 per cent duty on gross profit its telephone business, which plunged into the red this year.
The Sun (2009)
It would be pointless to agree a tax on gross profits as racing would lose out.
The Sun (2008)
That means the show alone will have grossed about 3 million.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
The cast album from the show has grossed about $11 million in sales.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The claimant did not need to establish either gross negligence or something more serious.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
They say it was gross misconduct and I'm now suspended.
The Sun (2012)
This smacks of gross negligence and it is the public who will suffer.
The Sun (2006)
Three others also face a probe over gross misconduct allegations.
The Sun (2014)
When you feel gross you don't want anyone touching bits of you that wobble.
The Sun (2014)
It must be remembered that in examining the results of this campaign attention must first be paid, not to the gross totals, but to the percentages.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
You could spend the entire gross domestic product on it, and still find shortages.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
The deduction is allowed in computing adjusted gross income.
Christianity Today (2000)
The country will lose about 15 per cent of its gross national product.
Radford, Tim & Leggett, Jeremy The Crisis of Life on Earth - our legacy from the second millenium (1990)

gruff

(ɡrʌf)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. burbero (‑a)

Example Sentences Including 'gruff'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
Some of the older pros were rough and gruff which must have influenced me.
Moynihan, John Kevin Keegan - Black and White (1993)
I was shown round by this gruff old foreman and learnt how to make beer.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
In a gruff voice, he gave the man a piece of his mind.
de Haan, Willem The Politics of Redress - crime, punishment and penal abolition (1989)
Just then came a knock at the door of the hut, and a gruff voice asked them to open the door.
E. Nesbit The Treasure Seekers (1899)
And yes, there is something quite funny about gruff old Churchill learning the power of the way.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Despite a gruff exterior, he was regarded as one of the most decent men in the music industry, always ready to mentor young songwriters.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The voice is gruff, pure Gotham.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Holden's voice was gruff, almost as if he were close to tears.
Baxter, Stephen Anti-Ice (1993)
A gruff voice comes on the telephone:'Hello!
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
Beneath that gruff exterior lies, well, a gruff interior.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
The male pads about, calling to females with gruff barks.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
They can be seen as rough and gruff bandits of the road.
The Sun (2015)
Come to me, he said in a gruff voice.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)

hard

(hɑːd)
Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est

adjective

    1. (substance) duro (‑a)
    2. (mud) indurito (‑a)
    this cheese is very hard questo formaggio è davvero duro
    to grow hard indurirsi
    hard cover (of book) copertina cartonata
    a hard nut to crack (problem, person) un osso duro
  1. (severe, tough)
    1. (gen) duro (‑a)
    2. (climate, weather, winter) rigido (‑a)
    3. (frost) forte
    to take a long hard look at sth esaminare qc attentamente
    the hard fact is that ... la verità nuda e cruda è che...
    hard lines! or hard luck! (British, informal) peccato!, scalogna!
    a hard luck story una storia pietosa
    he's as hard as nails (physically) è forte come un toro or una quercia (in temperament) è duro di cuore
    to take a hard line over sth adottare una linea dura in merito a qc
    to be hard on sb essere severo (‑a) con qn
    to be a hard worker essere un (a) gran (grande) lavoratore (‑trice)
  2. (difficult, gen) arduo (‑a), difficile
    this exercise is too hard for me quest'esercizio è troppo difficile per me
    I find it hard to believe that ... stento or faccio fatica a credere che... (+subjunc)
    to be hard to please essere esigente, essere difficile da accontentare

adverb

    1. (push) forte
    2. (work) sodo
    3. (think, try) bene
    4. (hit) forte, duramente
    to work hard lavorare sodo
    to freeze hard gelare
    it's snowing/raining hard sta nevicando/piovendo forte
    he was breathing hard respirava affannosamente
    to be hard hit (figurative) essere duramente colpito (‑a)
    to be hard done by (informal) essere trattato (‑a) ingiustamente or molto male
    to be hard at it (informal) darci dentro
    to be hard put (to it) to do sth essere in difficoltà a fare qc
    to try one's hardest to do sth fare di tutto per fare qc
    to take sth hard prendere (molto) male qc
    to be hard up for sth essere a corto di qc
    to look hard at guardare fissamente, esaminare attentamente
    to drink hard essere un (a) forte bevitore (‑trice)

Example Sentences Including 'hard'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
You always have to work hard for laughs.
Chris Gidney CELEBRATING SECOMBE: A Tribute to Sir Harry Secombe (2002)
London and the southeast have been hardest hit.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
You need to work hard and not give up.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Her father was an artist who did years of hard labour for mild criticisms of party policy.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
The discrepancy between what we are seeing and what we are hearing forces one to listen harder.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
The effect of these pressures is there to see if you look hard enough.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
The politics of the hard left are not pretty.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Things that are hard have more life at their heart than things that are easy.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Think long and hard about what you really want.
The Sun (2016)
We have tried very hard to listen to them.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Work hard during the day and you can party equally hard tonight.
The Sun (2016)
You think these people can be swayed by cold, hard sense about economics?
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
You must have been uncommonly hard up for something to do.
Edith Wharton The House of Mirth (1905)
He said: 'It was a hard time.
The Sun (2016)
It's important now to work hard and build something of importance.
The Sun (2016)
These top stars work really hard these days and they make life really hard for you.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Two yellow faces laughing so hard that they were shedding tears.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
We decided three months ago this would be it and the hardest part was telling the owners.
The Sun (2016)
We worked really hard this week in preparing for this game.
The Sun (2016)
Worked hard to get team going in the second half.
The Sun (2011)
Yet the people are hard judges too.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Some people have a hard time seeing me doing serious things.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
The gun metal is cold and hard.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
He was also kicked so hard his scooter almost tipped over.
The Sun (2016)
He was sentenced to eight years of hard labour.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Now they face the much harder task of deciding what do to about it.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Once exposed to this music it made radio a lot harder to listen to.
The Sun (2011)
The last three months have been the hardest of my life.
The Sun (2011)
The test is much harder than it used to be.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Their season will be long and hard.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Those people are going to be hit really hard.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
You have to put hard work in to be successful.
The Sun (2012)
Look hard and you can almost see the pages moving.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
We need time to work hard but also time to play.
Christianity Today (2000)
If it is very hard it is difficult to know which tools to recommend for all this.
Kitto, Dick Planning the Organic Vegetable Garden (1986)

harsh

(hɑːʃ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (punishment, person) severo (‑a), duro (‑a)
    2. (words) duro (‑a)
    3. (weather) rigido (‑a)
    4. (taste) pungente
    a harsh climate un clima rigido
    1. (discordant)
      1. (voice) sgradevole
      2. (colour) chiassoso (‑a), squillante
    2. (light) troppo forte
    3. (contrast) brusco (‑a)
    she's got a very harsh voice ha una voce molto sgradevole

Example Sentences Including 'harsh'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
Do not expect that numbers in your balance sheet can protect you from harsh economic reality.
Charles A. D'Ambrosio & Stewart D. Hodges & Richard Brealey & Stewart Myers Principles of Corporate Finance (1991)
And that extra warmth in the seas usually keeps us protected from the harshest cold of winter.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
Avoid harsh brights on the lips and always use a lip liner to minimise any colour bleed.
The Sun (2009)
In fact she is probably her own harshest critic.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It's simply facing reality in its harshest form.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Our first stop brought into sharp focus the harsh realities the people here endured during the war.
The Sun (2014)
The city usually experiences harsh winters, but this winter has been one of the coldest in decades.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The sonic landscape had changed to something altogether harsher and more real.
The Sun (2010)
Though his worst nightmare became harsh reality, something unexpectedly wonderful emerged from it.
The Sun (2015)
Women can be my harshest critics.
The Sun (2015)
And what a harsh lesson for Gloucester.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
He is learning a tough lesson in the harshest possible way.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Iwas taught a harsh lesson in my early days at Liverpool that stood me in good stead for the rest of my playing career.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Seems a bit harsh in the middle of the festive season.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
That is the harsh reality of facing the world champions.
The Sun (2016)
We've learnt a lot of harsh lessons today.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
You need to be your harshest critic.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
But a harsh strain of winter flu had roared in, opening up opportunities.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The doors of his room were flung open onto a beautiful garden and the harsh spring light cut across his bed.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
The light is harsh and bright.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
And she is not impressed by the tendency towards harsh criticism from users of the internet.
The Sun (2012)
It has taken a crisis of historic proportions to bring these harsh lessons to the fore.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
The interior of the gallery had become woefully shabby, with dull grey walls, poor flooring and harsh fluorescent lighting.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
This resulted in the family enduring harsh criticism in the media.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
This seems a bit harsh.
The Sun (2017)
Those who said he should serve longer for his part in the killing were brushed aside and accused of being harsh and cruel.
The Sun (2010)
Young people will face harsh realities in the world of work.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
The reality is as harsh as bright sunlight is unforgiving.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
This does not mean that harsh winter conditions are not possible, just that they cannot be identified at the moment.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
This harsh lesson has doubtless sunk in right across the academic world.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Although the winter was still young, the cold was harsh.
Christianity Today (2000)
These make the voice harsh, bitter, cold or lifeless.
Lumsden, Robert 23 Steps to Successful Achievement (1972)

high

(haɪ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (gen) alto (‑a)
    the wall's two metres high il muro è alto due metri
    a building 60 metres high un palazzo alto 60 metri
    how high is Ben Nevis? quanto è alto il Ben Nevis?
    since she was so high (informal) fin da quando era grande or alta così
    to leave sb high and dry (figurative) piantare in asso qn
    to be on one's high horse (figurative) montare or salire in cattedra
    to be or act high and mighty darsi delle arie
    1. (frequency, pressure, temperature, salary, price) alto (‑a)
    2. (speed, wind) forte
    3. (character, ideals) nobile
    4. (value, respect, number) grande
    to pay a high price for sth pagare (molto) caro (‑a) qc
    prices are higher in Germany i prezzi sono più alti in Germania
    there's high unemployment in Europe c'è una forte disoccupazione in Europa
    to be high in sth avere un alto contenuto di qc
    it's very high in fat ha un altissimo contenuto di grassi
    his colour is very high è molto rosso in viso
    to have a high old time (informal) spassarsela
    it's high time you were in bed (informal) dovresti essere già a letto da un pezzo
    1. (music, note) alto (‑a)
    2. (sound, voice) acuto (‑a)
    she's got a very high voice ha una voce molto acuta
  2. (informal)
    1. (on drugs) fatto (‑a)
    2. (on drink) su di giri
  3. (British, cookery)
    1. (meat, game) frollato (‑a)
    2. (spoilt) andato (‑a) a male

adverb

  1. (fly, aim, climb) in alto
    the doves flew high in the sky le colombe volavano alte nel cielo
    the plane flew high over the mountains l'aereo volava alto sulle montagne
    high up molto in alto
    high above the clouds in alto sopra le nuvole
    higher and higher sempre più (in) alto
    the bidding went as high as £500 le offerte sono arrivate fino a 500 sterline
    to hunt high and low cercare per mare e per terra
    feelings were running high c'era molta tensione

noun

  1. on high (in heaven) nell'alto dei cieli
    orders from on high (also humorous) ordini dall'alto
  2. exports have reached a new high le esportazioni hanno toccato un nuovo record
  3. (meteorology) anticiclone m, area di alta pressione

Example Sentences Including 'high'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
He plans to announce a new higher figure next month.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
That looks high enough for the time being.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
Yet rising employment ought to have brought with it higher output growth and higher incomes.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Was the pain high up or low down?
Susan Coolidge What Katy Did (1872)
A mountain is just a geographical feature that measures higher from top to bottom than 2,000ft.
The Sun (2016)
Overall we see this as part of a widening of the way we deliver higher education.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
The scrutiny is really high and people are so invested in it.
The Sun (2017)
There were points when taking bends at higher speeds that it almost felt out of control.
The Sun (2016)
Would you take the high ground if your organs failed?
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
By jumping relatively high and having a very short ground contact in between.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
The quantity has been whittled down because the quality was not high enough.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
We need to set our targets high.
The Sun (2016)
That was all handled by people high up who were doing this stuff.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
To get a better view, we climbed an observation platform high above the trees.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Alcohol is high in calories so should suppress appetite.
The Sun (2017)
Higher production taxes also hit the firm.
The Sun (2008)
Houses are surrounded by high walls topped by electric fences to keep out marauding bands of robbers.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
It was a day of highs and lows.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
New figures out this week are expected to show youth unemployment stubbornly high - close to one million.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
Official figures are due to be released tomorrow that could show net migration reaching an all-time high.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
The true figure is certainly much higher.
The Sun (2006)
There were also higher reports of vomiting bug norovirus.
The Sun (2017)
This finding suggests adaptive benefits inherent to a diet high in alcohol.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
We move on foot to some higher ground and look around.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We want to set our sights high.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
We were driven away at high speed.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
She also blames retention of green belt land for small houses and high prices.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
The high school commencement speaker was giving a rather conventional address.
Christianity Today (2000)
These groups require a high degree of readiness and motivation.
Herman, Judith Lewis Trauma and Recovery (1992)
This is enough for a small group of people to get a good high.
Cohen, Julian & Kay, James Taking Drugs Seriously (1994)

hollow

(ˈhɒləʊ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. cavo (‑a), vuoto (‑a)
    1. (eyes, cheeks) infossato (‑a)
    2. (sound, voice) cupo (‑a)
    3. (sympathy) falso (‑a)
    4. (promises) vano (‑a)
    a hollow victory una vittoria di Pirro
    to give a hollow laugh ridere a denti stretti

adverb

  1. to beat sb hollow (informal) stracciare qn

noun

    1. (of back) incavo
    2. (of hand) cavo
    3. (in ground) cavità f inv, affossamento
    4. (small valley) conca
    5. (in landscape) valletta, depressione f

Example Sentences Including 'hollow'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
On family holidays he crept into caves and hollow trees and played with their slimy interiors.
The Times Literary Supplement (2012)
We held him tight by both arms, and we marched him home down the hill in a hollow square of five.
E. Nesbit The Treasure Seekers (1899)
At the heart of the technology is a single X-ray source split into multiple beams, each of which takes the form of a hollow cone.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
In these circumstances the town can become a hollow and cynical place.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Its ability to survive lengthy periods between feeds was well suited to its original habitat: caves, rock crevices and hollow trees.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
There has been something hollow in their refusal to defend their politics with any ideological vigour.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
In the warm hollow Lily lay still and her breathing grew low and regular.
Edith Wharton The House of Mirth (1905)
Much of the interior is hollow now, forming a chamber big enough for the entire England rugby team to squeeze inside.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Now it feels empty and hollow.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
So the battle you win one day is a hollow victory the next.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
That may raise a hollow laugh right now.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
When they are done, the insides should be hollow.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
You should be left with a hollow shell.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
This allowed him to grasp a string attached to the neck of a bottle secreted in a concealed hollow inside the bark.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Those that stay to breed here will summer on northern and western moors, nesting in old rabbit holes and other hollows.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Today all that is left of the house is a hollow shell.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Yet it has proven to be hollow laughter.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
This may prove to be a hollow threat but it is still explosive.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Some bones have a hollow cavity containing bone marrow in which new red blood cells are produced.
McCahill, T. A. Biology Basic Facts (1982)
They make a den in a hollow tree.
Burton, John A. Animals of the World (1993)

keen

(kiːn)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (British, person) entusiasta
    he doesn't seem very keen non sembra molto entusiasta
    she's a keen student è una studentessa attenta e interessata
    he's a keen gardener è un appassionato di giardinaggio
    to be keen on sth (opera, theatre) essere appassionato (‑a) di qc (plan, idea) essere entusiasta di qc
    she's keen on the music master il maestro di musica le piace molto
    she's very keen on pop music le piace molto la musica pop
    to be keen to do or on doing sth avere una gran voglia di fare qc
    I'm not keen on going non mi va di andare
    I'm not keen to do it non ci tengo a farlo
    1. (edge, blade) affilato (‑a), tagliente
    2. (wind, air) tagliente
    3. (hearing) fine
    4. (appetite) robusto (‑a)
    5. (intelligence, eyesight, observation) acuto (‑a)
    6. (desire, delight, sense) intenso (‑a), forte
    7. (interest) vivo (‑a)
    8. (price, rate) competitivo (‑a)
    9. (competition, match, struggle) duro (‑a)

Example Sentences Including 'keen'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
It was really good fun and they were all keen sailors and enthusiastic.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
The keen golfer knew he needed an experienced playing partner.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Not only are consumers extremely keen on buying products online, they are also willing to shop internationally.
Computing (2010)
At work your interesting ideas and your keen eye for detail impress the bosses.
The Sun (2016)
Buyers keen on the idea of a mini purchase need to consider some practical downsides.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
They are also keen not to overspend.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
This is what makes a partner, new or old, keen to get closer.
The Sun (2009)
You have a keen eye for competitions with great odds and choose the best names and numbers when you go with your instincts.
The Sun (2016)
All these youngsters are keen to make it to the top.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
He is dead keen to be with us.
The Sun (2013)
The Germans are keen to make his move permanent but may struggle to meet the price tag.
The Sun (2013)
The duchess always says it's important to have a keen pair of ears and keep quiet.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
We are keen to avoid flying unless absolutely necessary.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
And there are legal firms linked to the music industry keen to take him on.
The Sun (2011)
England's head coach is keen to make his priority the training field.
The Sun (2006)
He also took a keen interest in the gift shops.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Her team of advisers are keen to get her featured in magazines such as Vogue.
The Sun (2017)
It's a lot of fun being this keen and enthusiastic.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
The Chinese are very keen on noise.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
The England star made some enquiries and is keen to get hold of her number.
The Sun (2010)
The Russians are also keen on it.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
The council is also keen to help voluntary groups promoting peace and combating extremism.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We are extremely keen for him to stay.
The Sun (2007)
You also have a keen eye for spotting antique bargains.
The Sun (2011)
You do not become an extraordinarily successful magazine publisher without a fine business sense and keen eye for spotting trends.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)

kind

(kaɪnd)

noun

  1. (species) sorta, specie f, genere m
    all kinds of things ogni genere di cose
    some kind of fish qualche tipo di pesce
    it's a kind of sausage è una specie di salsiccia
    he's not the kind of person to ... non è il tipo da...
    what kind of an answer is that? or what kind of an answer do you call that? che razza di risposta è questa?
    what kind of person do you take me for? per chi mi prendi?
    I had a kind of feeling that would happen avevo come il presentimento che sarebbe successo
    you know the kind of thing I mean sai cosa intendo or voglio dire
    something of the kind qualcosa del genere
    nothing of the kind! niente affatto!
    it's not his kind of film non è il tipo or genere di film che piace a lui, non è il suo genere di film
    they're two of a kind (pejorative) sono della stessa pasta
    it's the only one of its kind è l'unico nel suo genere
    it was tea of a kind (pejorative) era una sottospecie di tè
    I kind of thought this would happen (informal) quasi me l'aspettavo
    she looked kind of worried (informal) sembrava come preoccupata
    payment in kind pagamento in natura
    to repay sb in kind (after good deed) ricambiare la cortesia a qn (after bad deed) ripagare qn con la stessa moneta

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. gentile, buono (‑a)
    to be kind to sb essere gentile con qn
    would you be kind enough to ...? sarebbe così gentile da...?
    would you be so kind as to ...? le spiacerebbe...?
    thank you for being so kind grazie mille
    it's very kind of you (to do ...) è molto gentile da parte sua (fare...)
    thank you for your kind assistance (formal) la ringrazio per il gentile aiuto

Example Sentences Including 'kind'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
Violence of one kind or another is rarely far away.
The Times Literary Supplement (2011)
She says that her design is one of a kind.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
So we have an opportunity to lead the way on these kind of innovations.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
You are obviously a kind and caring individual.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
There are two kinds of negative emotion.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
They worked it out in some kind of way.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Those are the kind of things we really home in on now.
The Sun (2011)
Try different settings for different kinds of books.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
The new grey faceless maps were just one aspect of a new kind of war.
Len Deighton Bomber (2006 (1970))
They were a different kind of games.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
We know it will take them a bit of time to get over that kind of stuff.
The Sun (2016)
You could kind of feel something was happening.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
You need to adapt when you come to this kind of league.
The Sun (2013)
This is a nice place and the staff are friendly and kind.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Thank you again for this very kind deed.
The Sun (2009)
That kind of attitude under that kind of pressure proves that anything is possible.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
They were just kind of there.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
This is exactly the kind of relationship people wish existed more in the economy.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We got close and he was kind and caring.
The Sun (2016)
We have to change those kinds of attitudes.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
What kind of weather might that bring next winter?
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Why anyone regards this kind of thing as entertainment is beyond me.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
You kind of get past that though.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
People know these kinds of facts now.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
There are two kinds of red berry sprawling over the hedges now.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
This is just the kind of duty the police women could be entrusted with.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
What voters want is a broader conservatism rather than a wholly different kind.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
They were kind enough to come here and build them for us?
Bruce Feiler WALKING THE BIBLE (2001)

lax

(læks)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (conduct) lassista
    2. (person)
      1. (careless) negligente
      2. (on discipline) permissivo (‑a)
    to be lax about punctuality non tenere or badare alla puntualità

Example Sentences Including 'lax'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
But online shoppers are really lax over security.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Government because of lax controls and insufficient resources to confront the fraudsters.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
The alert follows concern about lax security at Indian call centres.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
There will be none of the easy loans and lax risk control that have become mainstream over the past decade.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Accidents do happen as a result of poor systems or a lax safety culture.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Neither is this a story about lax gun control.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
On balance, her ample stomach seems to suggest more impending motherhood than lax calorie control.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Security was lax and there were many students in the gallery at the time.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The management was criticised for failing to monitor practices such as providing false information, but also for lax systems.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
They point out that in America lax regulation has led to problems.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
After years of lax regulation, baseball has taken steps in recent years to clean up its image.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
I was a bit lax going into the Players.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Their lax attitude was epitomised by Cattermole.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
But ministers say the lax system means that many have wrongly been given a life on benefits.
The Sun (2012)
But the criteria for documentaries should be a little more lax.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Critics have warned that the Lords' system is too lax.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Furious critics yesterday said the lax benefits system is betraying honest couples who stay together.
The Sun (2008)
I am sick of the lax attitude towards basic manners and respect.
The Sun (2011)
It has been attacked for lax safety standards in Alaska and for missing production targets.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
It seemed a bit lax.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Recent incidents have pointed to lax security at museums and new risks to churches.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Serious traffic accidents are common in China owing to lax driving habits, overloaded vehicles and bad roads.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
The same goes for my increasingly lax attitude outside the home.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Worse still, it found a lax attitude towards enforcement of safety standards.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Second, financial regulation was too lax.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)

lean 1

(liːn)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. magro (‑a)
    the lean years i tempi di magra

noun

  1. (of meat) magro, parte f magra (della carne)

Example Sentences Including 'lean'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
They will seek to make the business leaner and fitter, and to restore the dividend.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
This was the sort of lean and mean memo an entrepreneur has to love.
Kiam, Victor Going For It!: How to Succeed As an Entrepreneur (1986)
She went into the garden and walked down to the foot to lean on the wall.
Paige, Frances The Glasgow Girls (1994)
Add the lean minced beef and fry for 5 mins.
The Sun (2017)
Eyes sparkling, she leans forward in her chair.
The Sun (2016)
He can also lean forward or move your legs to one side to change the way it feels for him.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
He leans forward to show me the scar on the bridge of his nose.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Protein powders are considered to be a fast route to a leaner body.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
She leans forward, clearly slightly worried that things have become a little too dour.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Slowly lean forward so that your chest approaches the ground.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The taste for lean meat has greatly increased the demand for venison.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
This is simply a push-up leaning against a door frame.
The Sun (2011)
Today their eyes are less glassy and all three look much leaner.
The Sun (2014)
We instinctively lean forward when trying to sell something.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
You have been a rock but maybe it is time to lean on your husband a bit more and let him take the lead.
The Sun (2016)
You lean in the direction you want to go and your weight banks the glider that way.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Pep is leaning forward, arms wrapped around his knees.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Buffalo meat has a tender texture and is leaner than beef.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Buildings lean over as if they are resting their head on a neighbour's shoulder.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Choose lean meat and remove visible fat.
Mervyn, Leonard Preventing Heart Disease (1987)
Try a dish of brown rice with lean meat and vegetables in a curry sauce.
Colette Harris, With Theresa Cheung PCOS DIET BOOK: How you can use the nutritional approach to deal with polycystic ovary syndrome (2002)
If you lean forward it goes faster, if you lean back it slows down.
The Sun (2016)
It is still leaning on the building.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
It sleeps leaning for support against a tree.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
She thinks he wants directions and leans to talk to him.
The Sun (2011)
This time he is leaning towards his rival.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
The health service will have to become smaller and leaner.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
This style seems to lean less on geography.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We spend thirty minutes leaning on our cars while we wrestle with his concerns.
Christianity Today (2000)

lewd

(luːd)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. osceno (‑a)

light 1

(laɪt)
Word forms:past tensepast participle lit lighted

noun

  1. (gen) luce f
    electric light illuminazione f or luce elettrica
    at first light alle prime luci dell'alba
    by the light of the moon alla luce della luna, al chiaro di luna
    in the cold light of day (also figurative) alla luce del giorno
    you're (standing) in my light mi fai ombra
    to hold sth up to or against the light tenere qc controluce
  2. (figurative)
    in the light of alla luce di
    to bring to light portare alla luce
    to come to light venire in luce, emergere
    to cast or shed or throw light on gettare or far luce su
    I was hoping that you could shed some light on it (for me) speravo che tu potessi darmi dei chiarimenti su questo
    to see the light (religion) convertirsi (figurative) ravvedersi
    to reveal sb/sth in a new light mostrare qn/qc sotto una nuova luce
    according to my lights (formal) secondo quanto mi è dato di capire
    1. (single light) luce f
    2. (lamp) luce, lampada
    3. (automobiles, aeronautics) fanale m, faro, luce
    to turn the light on/off accendere/spegnere la luce
    he switched on the light ha acceso la luce
    he switched off the light ha spento la luce
    rear lights luci di posizione posteriori
    the (traffic) lights were red il semaforo era rosso
  3. (flame) fiamma
    pilot light (on stove, water heater) fiammella di sicurezza
    have you got a light? (for cigarette) hai da accendere?
    to put a light to sth dar fuoco a qc

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (bright) chiaro (‑a)
    to get lighter rischiararsi, schiarirsi
  2. (colour, skin, hair, room) chiaro (‑a)
    light yellow giallo chiaro inv
    a light blue sweater una maglia azzurro chiaro

transitive verb

  1. (illuminate) illuminare, rischiarare
    to light sb's way far luce a qn
    lit by electricity illuminato (‑a) elettricamente
  2. (cigarette, fire, candle) accendere
    to light a bonfire accendere un falò
    to light the fire accendere il fuoco
    she lit the candles on the cake ha acceso le candeline sulla torta

intransitive verb

  1. (ignite) accendersi

Example Sentences Including 'light'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
Her face was clearly visible in the light from the open van door.
Lisa Scottoline ROUGH JUSTICE (2001)
She turned her head, ignoring the pain the movement caused as the square of bright light intruded.
Jennifer Fallon TREASON KEEP (2001)
There was no street light here; the closest was at least thirty or forty metres up the street.
Jon Cleary YESTERDAY'S SHADOW (2001)
He was dressed in golden armour that glittered in the dull afternoon light.
Jennifer Fallon TREASON KEEP (2001)

light 2

(laɪt)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (gen) leggero (‑a)
    a light jacket una giacca leggera
    a light meal un pasto leggero
    light ale birra chiara
    some light reading una lettura leggera
    she is a light sleeper ha il sonno leggero
    as light as a feather leggero (‑a) come una piuma
    to be light on one's feet avere il passo leggero
    with a light heart a cuor leggero
    to make light work of sth fare qc con molta facilità
    to make light of sth (figurative) prendere alla leggera qc, non dar peso a qc

adverb

  1. (travel) leggero, con poco bagaglio

Example Sentences Including 'light'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
Her face was clearly visible in the light from the open van door.
Lisa Scottoline ROUGH JUSTICE (2001)
She turned her head, ignoring the pain the movement caused as the square of bright light intruded.
Jennifer Fallon TREASON KEEP (2001)
There was no street light here; the closest was at least thirty or forty metres up the street.
Jon Cleary YESTERDAY'S SHADOW (2001)
He was dressed in golden armour that glittered in the dull afternoon light.
Jennifer Fallon TREASON KEEP (2001)

long 1

(lɒŋ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (in size) lungo (‑a)
    she's got long hair ha i capelli lunghi
    how long is it? quant'è lungo?
    how long is this river? quanto è lungo questo fiume?
    it is 6 metres long è lungo 6 metri
    to get longer allungarsi
  2. (in time) lungo (‑a)
    (for) a long time (per) molto tempo
    it takes a long time ci vuole molto tempo
    I've been waiting a long time aspetto da molto tempo
    how long is the film? quanto dura il film?
    how long will it take? quanto ci vorrà?
    how long did you stay there? per quanto tempo sei rimasto lì?
    2 hours long che dura 2 ore, di 2 ore
    a long walk/holiday una lunga camminata/vacanza
    a long job un lavoro lungo
    to have a long memory avere buona memoria
    it's been a long day (figurative) è stata una giornata lunga
    to take a long look at sth esaminare ben bene qc
    at long last finalmente

adverb

  1. a lungo, per molto tempo
    I shan't be long non ne avrò per molto
    he won't be long finishing non ci metterà molto a finire
    we didn't stay (for) long non ci siamo fermati a lungo
    I have long believed that ... è da molto tempo che credo che...
    he had long understood that ... aveva capito da molto tempo che...
    long before molto tempo prima
    long before now molto prima
    long before you came molto prima che tu arrivassi
    before long (+ future) presto, fra poco (+ past) poco tempo dopo
    he's long since departed se n'è andato molto tempo fa
    how long is it since you saw them? da quant'è che non li vedi?
    how long have you been here? da quanto sei qui?
    how long has he been learning Italian? da quanto studia l'italiano?
    long ago molto tempo fa
    how long ago? quanto tempo fa?
    as long ago as 1960 nientemeno che nel 1960
    he no longer comes non viene più
    all day long tutto il giorno
    so long as, as long as (while) finché (provided that) sempre che (+subjunc)
    I'll come as long as it's not too expensive verrò, sempre che non costi troppo
    so long! (informal) (especially US) ciao!
    don't be long! fai presto!
    it won't take long è questione di poco

noun

  1. the long and the short of it is that ... (figurative) a farla breve...

Example Sentences Including 'long'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
The reason why people no longer join political parties he suggests is simple.
The Times Literary Supplement (2012)
But that might not be possible for much longer.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
These cheaper options gave students a gentle nudge through a door they had long wanted to open.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
They would allow you to assess the worker over a longer period.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Those two arguments have been around a long time.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The system of constantly raising seat prices was no longer working.
Susie Gilbert and Jay Shir A TALE OF FOUR HOUSES: Opera at Covent Garden, La Scala, Vienna and the Met since 1945 (2003)
Yet those ends are no longer his own.
Arthur Herman THE SCOTTISH ENLIGHTENMENT: The Scots' Invention of the Modern World (2002)
But our holiday had sparked something that was long dead.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
They put in a good long winter stint of sleep.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
This has long since got out of hand.
The Sun (2016)
Want to live longer and look a little less creepy?
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We regret insurance can no longer be booked with postal applications.
The Sun (2016)
Your own initials seemed no longer to be enough.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
He is ready to end a long losing run.
The Sun (2017)
The match itself would have put most people off the game for a lot longer than that.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Those early years are now long gone.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Tweet of the day This could be a long winter.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We have come such a long way.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Wives are around a lot longer than your sporting years.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
You could also either swing longer or use a more powerful club.
Lewis, Beverly Winning Golf for Women (1993)
Four years is a long time.
The Sun (2008)
He was determined to go and visit when he heard she might not have long to live.
The Sun (2015)
If their files are misplaced it can take a very long time.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
People keep to themselves and are often away at other homes for long periods.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Why has it taken so long to decide something is wrong?
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Why the relatively long hiatus between albums?
The Sun (2013)
Worse was the cliché that older people were no longer creative or innovative.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
My friend has long since surpassed my ambitions and abilities.
Christianity Today (2000)
The whole place had the air of somewhere tidied before a long journey.
Marsden, Philip The Crossing-Place (1993)

loud

(laʊd)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (gen) forte
    2. (laugh, applause, thunder) fragoroso (‑a), forte
    3. (noisy, behaviour, party, protests) rumoroso (‑a)
    4. (pejorative, gaudy, colour, clothes) chiassoso (‑a), vistoso (‑a), sgargiante
    the radio's too loud il volume della radio è troppo alto

adverb

  1. (speak etc) forte
    out loud ad alta voce
    loud and clear chiaro e forte, molto chiaramente

Example Sentences Including 'loud'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
All are guilty of turning up the volume far too loud when listening to music through headphones.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Please also read this out loud for the court.
Colin Beavan FINGERPRINTS: Murder and the Race to Uncover the Science of Identity (2002)
It really is ridiculously fast and very loud.
The Sun (2011)
It wasn't anything particularly loud or noisy that he was playing.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Laugh long and loud and make other people laugh.
The Sun (2014)
Sometimes her moans are loud enough to be heard three courts away.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
The best way to ensure that your dialogue feels true is to read it out loud.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
The sun dives deep into the foundations of your chart to give you a calm self-assurance that gets better results than other louder, boastful voices.
The Sun (2016)
Its voice was loud and harsh.
E. Nesbit The Railway Children (1906)
Suddenly his voice rang loud and harsh.
Kathleen E. Woodiwiss THE WOLF AND THE DOVE
His whoop of delight was the loudest sound all day.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Luckily the alarm was loud enough for help to arrive.
The Sun (2016)
That is the loud and clear message.
The Sun (2016)
It makes the noise of a loud hairdryer and gives you an instant headache.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
At very loud volumes there is also the danger it will damage your hearing.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
But there was a loud bang and he collapsed in the chair.
The Sun (2008)
The practical effect is to make audio sound louder and more monotonous.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The price signal is now being heard loud and clear.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
They showed me the sign and made me say it out loud three times.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
This was not hard given that they were extremely loud and obnoxious whilst boarding and finding their seats.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
You might have felt better to say that out loud too.
The Sun (2016)
You will laugh out loud frequently but also be moved to tears at times by her story.
The Sun (2008)
Yesterday he took the risky step of saying something out loud.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Loud noises are sounded behind their heads.
Evans, Peter & Deehan, Geoff The Descent of Mind - the how and why of intelligence (1990)

low 1

(ləʊ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (gen) basso (‑a)
    2. (bow) profondo (‑a)
    3. (murmur) sommesso (‑a)
    4. (intelligence) scarso (‑a)
    5. (quality) scadente
    6. (biology, zoology, form of life) primitivo (‑a)
    7. (pejorative)
      1. (opinion, taste) cattivo (‑a)
      2. (character) pessimo (‑a)
      3. (behaviour) ignobile
      4. (café, place) malfamato (‑a)
    a low trick un tiro mancino, uno scherzo ignobile
    to feel low (depressed) sentirsi (un po') giù
    he was feeling a bit low era un po' giù
    he's very low (ill) è molto debole
    supplies are low le scorte si stanno esaurendo
    we are low on flour non c'è rimasta molta farina
    in a low voice a bassa voce
    in low gear (automobiles) in una marcia bassa
    on low ground in pianura
    lower down più in basso
    lower deck/floor ponte/piano inferiore

adverb

    1. (aim) in basso
    2. (sing) a bassa voce
    3. (fly) a bassa quota, basso
    4. (bow) profondamente
    that plane is flying very low quell'aereo vola molto basso
    to sink lower sprofondare sempre di più
    to fall or sink low (figurative) cadere in basso
    to turn sth down low (gas, radio etc) abbassare qc
    supplies are running or getting low le scorte stanno per finire

noun

  1. (meteorology) depressione f, zona di bassa pressione
  2. (figurative, low point)
    to reach a new or an all-time low toccare il livello più basso or il minimo

Example Sentences Including 'low'

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The pound is about 15 per cent lower against the dollar and 10 per cent lower against the euro since the referendum.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The tax should reflect the lower risk.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
They said the price was too low.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
I've always wanted a garden and a low door into it.
Paige, Frances The Glasgow Girls (1994)
Low specimens make a good yellow carpet.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Some firms have hit all-time lows in the credit crunch and are set for a rebound.
The Sun (2009)
The lights are low and a soporific electronic soundtrack fills the air.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
The sun has to be low enough to strike the dew at a sharp angle.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
They are fiercely competitive and offer lower prices year after year.
The Sun (2010)
You go through such highs and lows.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Some Buckle goes because he is too low in the weights.
The Sun (2016)
There is quality in the lower leagues.
The Sun (2017)
They see me sweating down to do low weights and riding dodgy novices.
The Sun (2010)
We will get a much lower percentage than before.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
This will fly lower and thus run more on landing so make sure you have the right club.
O'Connor, Christy & Smith, Peter Christy O'Connor Junior's Golf Masterclass (1993)
High bad cholesterol and low good cholesterol.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Strain the sauce and place in a small saucepan over a low heat to keep warm.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Air tries to move from high pressure to low pressure areas and the sharper the pressure gradient the faster it moves.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
And the proportions are all wrong because the ceilings are painfully low in relation to the floor plan.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Public trust in charities has crashed to an all-time low.
The Sun (2017)
She speaks with a slight slur but she has gradually gained partial use of her new lower lip.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
The euro plummeted to a new low against the dollar before making a slight recovery.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Then section off the top and tie the bottom half in a low ponytail.
The Sun (2013)
They also have a worryingly low profile.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Young has been a critic of digital music because the sound quality is lower than on vinyl.
The Sun (2012)
The good news for him was that expectations were not so much low as below ground.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
The fat content of these animals is relatively low.
Chaitow, Leon The Beat Fatigue Workbook - how to identify the causes (1988)
The highs and lows of five new preaching books.
Christianity Today (2000)
This leads to him feeling physically low and makes him more sensitive and therefore more vulnerable to stress.
Vera Peiffer POSITIVELY FEARLESS: Breaking free of the fears that hold you back (2001)

loyal

(ˈlɔɪəl)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. leale, fedele

Example Sentences Including 'loyal'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
The show had a loyal following from the beginning, and it grew.
Sidney Sheldon The Other Side of Me (2006 (2005))
Against these thousands of loyal citizens, how many real traitors who meant harm to their country were really uncovered?
Grenville, J. A. S. The Collins History of the World in the 20th Century (1994)
He adored and was loyal to his wife.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
He was always approachable to the most junior of his colleagues and a loyal and interested friend to many of us.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
It rather explains why northern soul fans are so loyal to the scene.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
People took sides and were loyal to their leader.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
She has always been a loyal, devoted daughter.
The Sun (2009)
She remained a loyal and loving support to him throughout his life.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
The scones, cheese straws and apple cakes all have loyal fans.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
You have a very loyal following.
The Sun (2011)
But for now the fans are loyal and tickets remain in demand.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
For some riders, the financial benefits of staying loyal may be too good to turn down.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
He was a brilliant man to ride for and was always totally loyal to his jockeys.
The Sun (2011)
It's steeped in history and it's got a fantastically loyal support.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Southampton can count on loyal support too.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
This city is hugely loyal and sponsors support all sports.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We have a very loyal fan base and they weren't getting what they paid for.
The Sun (2016)
Yet it would not be a massive surprise if the Spaniard stays loyal to this club.
The Sun (2013)
Dishes such as sweet and sour mackerel and venison with smoked potato have won him a loyal following.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
As a good father, a loyal friend and a committed lawyer who helped future generations to look back on the death penalty as a relic of history.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
But not all fans have stayed so loyal.
The Sun (2014)
C4 needs Bake Off fans to stay loyal.
The Sun (2016)
Find time for a loyal friend who feels left out of your life.
The Sun (2008)
My wife has been loyal and loving to me through it all.
The Sun (2015)
Public investment has benefited a new cast of oligarchs loyal to the leader.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Sikhs are the most loyal of British citizens.
The Sun (2014)
Surely this is the final gift of a loyal wife.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
The Beeb is defending the three stars for staying loyal.
The Sun (2016)
There has always been a loyal two-way street between manager and chairman.
The Sun (2007)

mean 2

(miːn)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (with money) avaro (‑a), spilorcio (‑a), gretto (‑a)
    mean with avaro (‑a) con
    he's too mean to buy presents è troppo avaro per comprare regali
  2. (unkind, spiteful) meschino (‑a), maligno (‑a)
    a mean trick uno scherzo ignobile
    that's a really mean thing to say! che cosa meschina da dire!
    you're being mean to me sei cattivo con me
    you mean thing! (informal) che meschino!
    it made me feel mean mi ha fatto sentire un verme
  3. (US, vicious)
    1. (animal) cattivo (‑a)
    2. (person) perfido (‑a)
  4. (poor, appearance, district) misero (‑a)
    she's no mean cook è una cuoca tutt'altro che disprezzabile

Example Sentences Including 'mean'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
The decline in the value of sterling means that the work is worth less to them.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The same product can mean very different things to its many buyers.
Tom Cannon Basic Marketing. Principles and Practice (1986)
The stamp duty surcharge also meant buyers tried to close deals quickly.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
They are goal oriented but enjoy the means as well as the ends.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
His habit also means you are passive smoking.
The Sun (2011)
Memoirs are meant to set the record straight.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Most mean well and are simply looking to share in the miracle of life with you.
The Sun (2009)
The way people say it can mean something that might not be the same for you.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
This is a slow burner and meant to be one.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
This means that your money is being used to support projects that help the environment.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
We would like to see the views that mean something to you.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
What does being good with money mean to you?
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
You could realise you mean much more to a partner than you think.
The Sun (2010)
Your confidence and willpower suddenly feel so strong, meaning you can set the pace in a loving relationship.
The Sun (2016)
As the seconds passed, the enormity of what one goal would mean became all the more stark.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It is all well meant but it also means there is no shutting off.
The Sun (2016)
It means he has scored the winning goals in three consecutive games for Spurs.
The Sun (2013)
Some people say stuff they mean and other times people say stuff for a crowd.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
That means that each game is already a kind of final.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
That means we go there to win our game.
The Sun (2010)
Not tipping makes me feel mean and petty.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Red lips for the party just mean you intend to enjoy the party properly.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
What do these findings and statistics mean to the average person?
Kowalski, Robert E The 8-Week Cholesterol Cure (1990)
This means the average employee is paid 1,700 a year while not working.
The Sun (2016)
This means you will go to court and you may be given a life sentence.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Which of course means they are not secure at all.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Passing off toys to another church means that you accept a measure of indignity.
Christianity Today (2000)
But large antennae mean low overall productivity.
Oliver Morton Eating the Sun: How Plants Power the Planet (2007)

meek

(miːk)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. mite, umile
    meek and mild mite come un agnello

Example Sentences Including 'meek'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
It is fair to say that in their presence I tended to be quiet, almost meek.
Frankie Dettori with Jonathan Powell FRANKIE: The Autobiography of Frankie Dettori (2004)
I care not a jot if the great Republic pursues its meek and compliant subjects to the ends of the earth.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
He and his mother are quiet and meek.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
People now realise this meek little mouse can roar if she wants.
The Sun (2012)
Why couldn't I have just been a meek little rabbit?
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
But he would be well advised to think hard about going to Villa Park based on this meek surrender.
The Sun (2012)
So it's knockout rugby, not for the meek and mild.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
We had a period today that was a bit meek and mild and we have to cut those periods out.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
His beautiful, booming voice had transformed this meek man into a powerful, soulful star.
The Sun (2011)
In court, Can tried to act meek and mild.
The Sun (2009)
It looked like a pretty meek surrender.
The Sun (2007)
He asked us to learn from Him to be meek and humble of heart.
Bertodano, Theresa (ed.) Daily Readings with Mother Theresa (1993)
Instead of that, just a meek and lowly man riding upon the foal of a donkey.
Christianity Today (2000)

mellow

(ˈmɛləʊ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (fruit) ben maturo (‑a)
    2. (wine) maturo (‑a) e pastoso (‑a)
    3. (colour, light) caldo (‑a) e morbido (‑a)
    4. (person, character) addolcito (‑a) dall'età
    5. (sound) melodioso (‑a)
    after a few glasses of wine he was quite mellow dopo qualche bicchiere di vino era piuttosto brillo

intransitive verb

    1. (fruit, wine) maturare, maturarsi
    2. (colour, sound) attenuarsi, smorzarsi
    3. (person, character) addolcirsi

transitive verb

  1. old age has mellowed him con l'età si è addolcito

Example Sentences Including 'mellow'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
Although he has mellowed a little since then, he is still a long way from being easy listening.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Both have a sprinkling of lighter and darker hues, subtleties that come when a house has mellowed over centuries.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
The impatience in his nature only partly mellowed with age.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The instant appeal of the house comes from the mellow red brick perfectly matched by the clay roof tiles.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
You can eat chutney straight away, but it's best once the flavours mellow after a month or so of ageing.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
He has mellowed a little since then, but the frustration remains.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
I'm quite mellow and calm and tolerant, as a matter of fact.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Players tend to mellow and become a bit more streetwise as they get older.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The morning after the night before his mood had mellowed.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Has age mellowed your desire to consume?
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
It's mild enough to eat straightaway, although it will mature and mellow if you leave it for at least a month before eating.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Nice clear pink colour, mellow and fruity.
Lockspeiser, Jerry & Gear, Jackie Thorsons Organic Wine Guide (1991)
The cider is stored in old oak rum barrels to impart a mellow background flavour.
Lockspeiser, Jerry & Gear, Jackie Thorsons Organic Wine Guide (1991)
The natural weight of the wine has rounded well and produced a delightfully mellow flavour with great depth of character.
Lockspeiser, Jerry & Gear, Jackie Thorsons Organic Wine Guide (1991)
As the fish age in the oil in which they are preserved, they become more mellow and tender.
The Sun (2014)
He said he was a changed man, that he had mellowed and matured.
The Sun (2013)
It was really mellow and calming and a little bit pretty.
The Sun (2014)
The moon visits the heart of your chart so your love mood is mellow.
The Sun (2009)
Smoking drugs produces a slower, sometimes more mellow effect.
Cohen, Julian & Kay, James Taking Drugs Seriously (1994)

mild

(maɪld)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (climate, punishment, weather) mite
    2. (character, person, cheese, voice) dolce
    3. (flavour, taste) delicato (‑a), non piccante
    4. (curry) non piccante
    5. (illness, sedative, beer, cigar) leggero (‑a)
    6. (effect) blando (‑a)
    it's mild today non fa freddo oggi
    the winters are quite mild gli inverni sono abbastanza miti
    mild soap sapone neutro

noun

  1. (British) birra leggera

Example Sentences Including 'mild'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
It has a nice mild flavour with depth and smoky tones.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Perhaps the most chilling thought is that by the standards of other internet security issues, swamping attacks are a relatively mild problem.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Snow is looking increasingly unlikely as mild air sweeps in from the south.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
The best news is that the cold snap this week is not expected to last long before milder Atlantic air returns towards the weekend.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
The outlook for this month is for a fairly typical mix of cold spells and milder interludes.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
The taste is slightly milder than domestic garlic.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
They have a mild but pleasant flavour and go well with meat or fish.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
They only have a mild flavour and contain very little flesh around the outer skin.
The Sun (2016)
You may find you prefer the texture and milder taste of farmed.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
What happens if I get a mild reaction?
Kowalski, Robert E The 8-Week Cholesterol Cure (1990)
Fewer people suffer heart attacks when the weather is mild.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
It was mild and gentle and didn't dry my skin.
The Sun (2007)
Light snow is possible for many but it should get milder from Monday.
The Sun (2013)
Mild weather has also been a theme this month.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
There is a mild background flavour of tinned tomato and a hint of malt vinegar.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
These drugs can make your illness milder and make you feel better faster.
The Sun (2009)
They said her illness was a mild infection caused by the cystic fibrosis she had suffered since early childhood.
The Sun (2010)
Why should the mild, gentle culture of the Anglicans not deserve the same preservation and respect as any other ancient culture?
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Yesterday it stayed mild and wet in many places.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
The symptoms of the disease are relatively mild and recovery quick.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Wet and sometimes windy weather looks likely to continue this week thanks to a mild air flow from the south.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
But again these can be extremely mild, and there may be no pain at all.
Westcott, Patsy Alternative Health Care for Women (1991)
Walking remains the best form of mild exercise.
Lumsden, Robert 23 Steps to Successful Achievement (1972)
We all experience apathy in its milder forms from time to time.
Knowles, Jane Know Your Own Mind (1991)

moist

(mɔɪst)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (gen) umido (‑a)
    2. (cake) soffice
    eyes moist with tears occhi umidi di lacrime
    sow the seeds in moist soil piantate i semi nel terreno umido
    this cake is very moist questa torta è molto soffice

Example Sentences Including 'moist'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
Allowing the joint to cool in the sauce will keep the meat moist and thicken the stew.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Bake for ten minutes on a middle shelf until the fish is just cooked and the vegetables are moist rather than wet.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
But the mass of warm, moist tropical air carried in an old hurricane can hang in the atmosphere like an unexploded bomb.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Enough moist air reaches the capital to make it a wetter and duller place but it is also warmer.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Grow in a sheltered position where you can smell the flowers in moist, well-drained soil.
The Sun (2016)
Ideally, plant them straight away, or heel them in somewhere in moist soil in the shade before moving them to their permanent position.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
It should still be slightly moist in the centre, but it will firm up as it cools.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Keep the rice moist but not too wet.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Needs moist soil all year round.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Plant in moist soil in partial shade.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The crumbs should still be slightly moist to the touch; they will dry and harden as they cool.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
The lamb continues to cook while it is left to rest, leaving the meat so moist and tender that you can virtually cut it with a spoon.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Then serve to exceptionally moist carrot cake.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
These plants need a sunny position and fertile, moist soil.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
This will keep the tree moist and hold it firmly in the container.
The Sun (2009)
They clump up happily over a few years in moist soil and you can divide them with ease.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
The flesh is creamy, moist and very good.
Smith, Drew Food Watch (1994)
Additional stuffing under the skin is a nice touch and keeps the meat moist.
The Sun (2011)
Keep it moist but not wet.
The Sun (2011)
Leave to soak for at least six hours or ideally overnight for a really moist cake.
The Sun (2014)
The ground needs to be kept reasonably moist and you should remove any weeds that emerge.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
The surface of the compost should be reasonably moist and free of weeds.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)

narrow

(ˈnærəʊ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (gen) stretto (‑a)
    2. (advantage, majority) scarso (‑a)
    3. (outlook, mind) ristretto (‑a), limitato (‑a)
    4. (interpretation) limitato (‑a)
    5. (means) limitato (‑a), modesto (‑a)
    to have a narrow escape farcela per un pelo, scamparla bella
    to take a narrow view of avere una visione limitata di

transitive verb

  1. (also narrow down)
    1. (road, investigations) restringere
    2. (choice) restringere, ridurre
    to narrow sth down to ridurre qc a
    we have narrowed the field (down) to three candidates abbiamo ristretto la scelta a tre candidati
  2. (eyes) stringere

intransitive verb

    1. (road) restringersi
    2. (majority) ridursi
    3. (eyes) stringersi
    so the question narrows down to this la questione, quindi, si riduce a questo

Example Sentences Including 'narrow'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
A narrow margin of victory for her would increase the likelihood of that.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Over the same period, the big four have narrowed the price gap with the discounters in varying degrees.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
With some effort we turned the column around on a very narrow track.
Stewart, Bob (Lt-Col) Broken Lives (1993)
No one can criticise this collection for a narrow range of desire.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
She could be quite something if she narrows her focus.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
She leads us down another narrow path twisting deeper into the woods.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The issue of making a fictional political figure believable was once a rather narrow constraint.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The sensible one who keeps her friends on the straight and narrow.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
The space is long and narrow, with side aisles going off it to left and right.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Two narrow staircases lead upstairs - the first heads up to the king double, the second to a snug.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The distance narrowed and the three saw a favor in that only two pursued.
Kathleen E. Woodiwiss THE WOLF AND THE DOVE
We all need to make the most of such narrow escapes.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Continue your stroll to supper along this narrow cobbled lane, where paintings and sculptures by local artists fill the doorways.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Cut the layered sheets in half lengthways to make two narrow rectangles.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
To see who is doing what at the end of which implausibly narrow lane.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Two narrow wooden shelves hold a variety of prints and pictures which can be constantly changed without damaging the fabric of the wall.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Conversely the gap narrows when things are looking up.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
In a narrow and limited sense, such an approach would seem reasonable.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
In the narrow strait just one oil tanker sunk would halt shipping for months.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Old men and women wander aimlessly around what used to be narrow streets and gardens.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The future of the game rests largely on the gap narrowing further.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
The price gap between the two is narrowing.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We tend not to hire people with very narrow and very deep experience.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Teaching, therefore, focuses on too narrow a range of topics and skills.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
The purpose of any trade deal should be to boost prosperity, not make narrow political points.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
Their leaves are long and narrow, and some of them are already a glossy yellow.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
What gives it the right to destroy a national joy and replace it with something parochial and small and narrow?
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
The streets are much narrower than we remembered.
Christianity Today (2000)
This exercise can be carried out with both narrow and wide grip.
Lycholat, Tony Shape Your Body, Shape Your Life (1987)

near

(nɪəʳ)

adverb

  1. vicino
    it's quite near è abbastanza vicino
    I like to know that you are near mi piace sapere che tu sei (qui) vicino or accanto
    near at hand a portata di mano (event) imminente, alle porte
    to come or draw near (person, event) avvicinarsi
    come nearer vieni più vicino, avvicinati
    to bring sth nearer (to) portare qc più vicino (a)
    he came near to being drowned per poco non è annegato
    near to tears sul punto di piangere
    that's near enough va bene così
    there were 100 people there, near enough c'erano pressappoco 100 persone
    nowhere near full ben lontano (‑a) dall'essere pieno (‑a)

preposition

    1. (also near to) (of place) vicino a, presso
    2. (in time) circa, quasi
    it's very near to the school è molto vicino alla scuola
    near here/there qui/lì vicino
    is there a bank near here? c'è una banca qui vicino?
    I live near Liverpool abito vicino a Liverpool
    he was standing near the door era in piedi vicino alla porta
    it was somewhere near midnight era circa mezzanotte
    it's somewhere near here dev'essere da queste parti
    the passage is near the end of the book il brano è verso la fine del libro
    his views are very near my own è di vedute molto simili alle mie
    nobody comes anywhere near her at cooking nessuno può competere con lei in cucina

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (in space, time) vicino (‑a)
    where's the nearest service station? dov'è la stazione di servizio più vicina?
    the nearest shops were three kilometres away i negozi più vicini erano a tre chilometri di distanza
    in the near distance a breve distanza
    the nearest way la via or strada più breve
    £25,000 or nearest offer (British) 25.000 sterline trattabili
    in the near future in un prossimo futuro
  2. (relation) stretto (‑a), prossimo (‑a)
  3. their win was a near thing hanno vinto di misura
    that was a near thing! per un pelo!

transitive verb

  1. (place, event) avvicinarsi a
    the building is nearing completion il palazzo è quasi terminato or ultimato

Example Sentences Including 'near'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
Heat gently until it is slightly hotter than drinking temperature, but nowhere near boiling point.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
His arm muscles were shaking hard as he neared the safe point.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
One of your goals is near completion and could have positive financial implications.
The Sun (2015)
The dismay is near universal but appears to be impotent.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The need to be near a lavatory put an end to his social life.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
The resort grew despite moments of near bankruptcy.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
There was one cinema near us that did two double bills a week.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
This chest was found quite near where the ships went down.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
She felt more than a little apprehensive coming near him.
Kathleen E. Woodiwiss THE WOLF AND THE DOVE
Brunt, following in, despatched a meaty drive into the far corner from near the edge of the area.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
It was important we won and closed the gap near the top a little.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Nobody seemed willing to go near him.
The Sun (2009)
That performance was nowhere near good enough.
The Sun (2014)
The money we have spent is nowhere near the top four or five but we are here to compete.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
They run independently but near enough for her to recognise him.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
Wales should have added at least one try near the end.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Yet those contests seem no nearer to happening.
The Sun (2010)
At sporadic intervals, we hear helicopter and speedboat engines humming above and near our little creek fortress.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The same fabric is found on a slipper chair that sits near an oversized painted wardrobe.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Four men were shot dead near me.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
He has yet to receive a reply and meanwhile the building nears completion.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The six inhabitants now live near by with relatives.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
There are so many ways to beat boredom without going near a slots game of any sort.
The Sun (2016)
There have been moments when the two appeared near divorce.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
This draft policy goes nowhere near far enough to exclude any potential financial benefit.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Two of their dogs were found dead near them.
The Sun (2006)
You note the legal impossibility of merciful death near home.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
When they did get near they saw two charred remains of human beings.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)

neat

(niːt)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (tidy)
      1. (person, handwriting) ordinato (‑a)
      2. (room, house, desk) ordinato (‑a), in ordine
      3. (work) accurato (‑a), pulito (‑a)
    2. (well-dressed) curato (‑a) nel vestire
    3. (skilful)
      1. (plan, solution) indovinato (‑a), azzeccato (‑a)
    4. (US, informal, excellent) figo (‑a)
    she is a neat worker è molto accurata nel lavoro
    he has made a neat job of the bathroom ha fatto un buon lavoro or un lavoro accurato nel bagno
    she has a neat figure è ben proporzionata
    a neat little car una bella macchinetta
  1. (undiluted, spirits) liscio (‑a)

Example Sentences Including 'neat'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
The resulting miniature masterpiece could be packed into small boxes that then fitted into neat cases ready for export.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
The small and neat would be at home.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
We make this area neat and clean.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
With a budget of 1 million you can find yourself a neat little modern apartment.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Always involved in neat exchanges and highly dangerous.
The Sun (2013)
It is just a case of being neat and tidy.
The Sun (2014)
Little settled it in injury time with a neat finish.
The Sun (2009)
Neat finish capped a super display.
The Sun (2013)
Some neat touches in another impressive display.
The Sun (2011)
You could always spot him as he was so neat and tidy.
The Sun (2015)
The common areas are full of good vibes and neat touches.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The house managed the neat trick of being grand without being in the least formal.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
What you need up top is something neat and close to the body.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Now that's a neat hat trick.
The Sun (2016)
This is an impressively neat piece of writing.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
With a really neat haircut and stubble.
The Sun (2014)
Real jobs don't fit into neat compartments.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
No one had read the "neat little signs" around the ship telling people how to put them on.
Christianity Today (2000)

new

(njuː)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. nuovo (‑a)
    1. (brand new) nuovo (‑a) di zecca
    2. (different) nuovo (‑a), altro (‑a)
    3. (bread) fresco (‑a)
    he buys a new car every year (brand-new) si compra una macchina nuova ogni anno
    her new boyfriend il suo nuovo ragazzo (different) si compra una nuova macchina or una macchina diversa ogni anno
    bring me a new glass portami un altro bicchiere
    new potatoes patate fpl novelle
    as good as new come nuovo (‑a)
    that's nothing new non è una novità
    what's new? ci sono novità?
    are you new here? sei nuovo di qui?
    I'm new to this job sono nuovo del mestiere
    the idea was quite new to him l'idea gli risultava nuova

Example Sentences Including 'new'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
The police say that new victims are still coming forward and that the conman remains at large.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
All4's new series takes an alternative look at bikers.
The Sun (2016)
And from today British audiences can see some of the freshest and the best new films from Russia.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
But they are reluctant to pick a fight with the new regime early on.
The Sun (2016)
If you are single, your new love has recently won a cash prize.
The Sun (2016)
Last week it reopened with its new name.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The family opened a new branch recently.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
The sun is back in your birth sign to line up new experiences and opportunities.
The Sun (2016)
There is no question of there being too many new properties across the capital as a whole.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
This is something new under the sun.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
We can expect more like this new one.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Wheel and deal for new players and finesse tactics until the trophy cabinet groans.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
New officers and a new code of fighting.
Iain Gale Man of Honour (2007)
Is the new series funnier then?
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
It has just launched a new cream.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It helps me to come up with new concepts.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
BRITAIN'S biggest pub chain is toasting a profit - after overhauling the business to deal with new laws.
The Sun (2016)
It brings fresh hope for new heart disease treatments.
The Sun (2007)
Pound World said last night they hoped to reopen the branch under a new name.
The Sun (2009)
She has recently found a new guy.
The Sun (2008)
Singer as writer is not a remotely new concept.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
So why would you buy a new home by a river these days?
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
The firm has given users new ones after complaints of faulty batteries.
The Sun (2016)
The public sector was still the main new recruiter.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Women have also seen many new opportunities for employment.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Would you like to be part of an existing show or do something new?
The Sun (2017)
You must learn to interact in a whole new way with the different people you have become.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
You want new experiences in new places this year.
The Sun (2013)
Your new love has just won a rather glamorous prize.
The Sun (2007)
This is a great prayer with which to begin a new year.
Christianity Today (2000)

odd

(ɒd)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (strange) strano (‑a)
    how or that's odd! che strano!
    he says some odd things dice delle cose strane
  2. (number) dispari inv
    an odd number un numero dispari
    1. (extra, left over) in più
    2. (unpaired, sock) spaiato (‑a)
    if you have an odd minute se hai un momento libero
    the odd man or one out l'eccezione f
  3. (occasional) occasionale
    at odd moments in certi momenti
    he has written the odd article ha scritto qualche articolo
  4. (and more)
    30 odd 30 e rotti, poco più di 30
see also odds

Example Sentences Including 'odd'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
The phone rang only one more time, at an odd, half-lit hour.
John Colapinto ABOUT THE AUTHOR (2002)
Her underwear was on a white linen mat at one side of the bed, neatly folded, which seemed odd.
Mark Burnell CHAMELEON (2002)
I had the odd feeling that he was trying to tell me something.
Stuart Harrison BETTER THAN THIS (2002)
Food had been served to them earlier by an orderly grown accustomed to glacial silences, split only by the odd cracking of a wooden chair.
Robert Wilson THE COMPANY OF STRANGERS (2002)

old

(əʊld)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (gen) vecchio (‑a), anziano (‑a)
    2. (ancient) antico (‑a), vecchio (‑a)
    an old man un vecchio
    old people or folk(s) i vecchi, gli anziani
    my grandfather is very old mio nonno è molto vecchio
    to grow or get old(er) invecchiare
    he's old for his years è maturo per la sua età
    the old country la madrepatria
    as old as the hills vecchio (‑a) come Matusalemme or come il cucco
    the old part of Glasgow la zona vecchia di Glasgow
    an old friend of mine un mio vecchio amico
    here's old Peter coming! (informal) ecco che arriva il vecchio Peter!
    she's a funny old thing (informal) è un tipetto buffo
    we had a high old time (informal) ci siamo divertiti un sacco
    any old thing will do (informal) va bene qualsiasi cosa
    I say, old man or old boy! (old-fashioned) vecchio mio!
    my old man (informal, father) il (mio) vecchio
  1. how old are you? quanti anni hai?
    she is 8 years old ha 8 anni
    an 8-year-old boy un bambino di 8 anni
    she is 2 years older than you ha 2 anni più di te
    he's older than me è più vecchio di me
    older brother/sister fratello/sorella maggiore
    my older brother mio fratello maggiore
    the older generation i vecchi
    he's old enough to look after himself è grande abbastanza per sbrigarsela da solo
    to be old enough to vote avere l'età per votare
    you're old enough to know better! alla tua età dovresti avere più senno!
    when you're older (to child) quando sarai grande
    if I were 20 years older se avessi 20 anni di più
  2. (former) precedente
    my old school la mia vecchia scuola
    in the old days una volta, ai vecchi tempi
    it's not as good as our old one non è buono come quello vecchio

noun

  1. the old (plural noun) i vecchi, gli anziani
  2. of old da tempo
    in days of old nei tempi passati

Example Sentences Including 'old'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
In rural areas where educational standards were low and culture relatively static, old ideas remained unchallenged.
Garraty, John Arthur The American Nation: A History of the United States to 1877 (1995)
Most of them were against older and better teams but we all learnt a good deal from opposing older and more experienced players.
Leo McKinstry Sir Alf: A Major Reappraisal of the Life and Times of England's Greatest Football Manager (2006)
Being responsible for the care of an older or ill person is not normally something that runs to a set schedule.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The person will fail to recognise various old friends and acquaintances.
Thomas Blaikie Blaikie's Guide to Modern Manners (2005)
And you don't need to use these old skills in a conventional way.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
No one was pretending the new numbers were anywhere near as good as the old favourites.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Smoking increases risk of suffering osteoporosis and bone fractures in old age.
The Sun (2016)
Some people leave their old accounts open for a few months in case anything was missed in the transfer process.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
We also wander around the old town.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Welcome to the world's oldest youth club.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
You know that old saying about mixing business and pleasure?
The Sun (2013)
You need to book at this restaurant in the old town.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Zagreb's elegant old town and buzzing nightlife are well worth jumping on a plane for.
The Sun (2016)
Has the old enemy gone soft?
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
If only Hunt had been around to see it with his old rival.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Yet there was the sense of an older gentleman wondering about the younger generation.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
She was two years old at the time.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
These give you a clue as to whether the wine is old or young.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Now the Suffolk county town is giving its old rival a run for its money.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Reforms on how to use retirement pots have led to a flood of fraudsters targeting older people by phone or email.
The Sun (2016)
Researchers have found that older people are able to retain a range of skills effectively.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
The older generation certainly know what they need to do.
The Sun (2016)
We got on well just like old times and we shared a taxi home.
The Sun (2016)
Young and old can have a go.
The Sun (2010)
Now the time has come for you to take on your anxiety, to confront the old enemy.
Hambly, Dr Kenneth Banish Anxiety - how to stop worrying and take charge of your life (1991)
The desire to be seen and known is as old as humanity.
Christianity Today (2000)
The older person will mostly go for walks.
Lutzner, Dr Helmut Successful Fasting -the easy way to cleanse your body of its poisons (1990)
Wisdom makes a particularly big contribution to happiness in old age.
Paul Martin MAKING HAPPY PEOPLE (2005)

pert

(pɜːt)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (girl, answer) impertinente, sfacciato (‑a)
    2. (hat) spiritoso (‑a)

Example Sentences Including 'pert'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
A pert naked male bottom is held in freeze frame.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Her face is young and pert.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
They are small and pert.
The Sun (2013)
We also had some chips, a fennel gratin and a pert little salad of dressed leaves and radishes.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Here is how to hone and tone it into a perfectly pert shape.
The Sun (2013)

plain

(pleɪn)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (clear, obvious) chiaro (‑a), palese, evidente
    2. (path, track) ben segnato (‑a)
    it's as plain as a pikestaff or as the nose on your face (informal) è chiaro come il sole
    you have made your feelings plain ti sei spiegato benissimo
    to make sth plain to sb far capire chiaramente qc a qn
    do I make myself plain? mi sono spiegato?
    he's lying, that's plain è chiaro che mente
  1. (outspoken, honest, frank) franco (‑a), aperto (‑a), schietto (‑a)
    plain dealing sincerità, franchezza
    in plain language or English in parole povere
    I shall be plain with you sarò franco con te
    1. (simple, with nothing added) semplice
    2. (paper, unlined) non rigato (‑a)
    3. (fabric, in one colour) in tinta unita inv
    4. (without seasoning) scondito (‑a)
    the plain truth la pura verità
    he's a plain man è un uomo semplice
    plain stitch (knitting) maglia a diritto
    a plain tie una cravatta in tinta unita
    a plain white blouse una camicetta bianca, semplice
    it's just plain commonsense (informal) è una questione di semplice buon senso
    to send sth under plain cover spedire qc in busta riservata
  2. (not pretty) insignificante, scialbo (‑a)

adverb

  1. (informal, simply, completely) semplicemente
  2. (clearly)
    I can't put it plainer than that non potrei esprimermi più chiaramente

noun

  1. (geography) pianura
  2. (knitting) (maglia a) diritto

Example Sentences Including 'plain'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
It would be another blow to tobacco companies, which had to introduce plain packaging in May and face annual tax increases under the tobacco duty escalator.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Pin and stitch one half width to outside edge of each full width with plain flat seams.
Churchill, Jane (ed.) Collins Complete Books of Soft Furnishings (1993)
These heading tapes look marvellous combined with sheer and plain fabrics.
Churchill, Jane (ed.) Collins Complete Books of Soft Furnishings (1993)
Cue the sound of disappointment at the prospect of writing solely about her rather plain white walls.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Team with a plain white tee and some chic heels for a timeless outfit.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
The film makes plain all kinds of details we may have missed or forgotten.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
They should go back to having auditions just as plain as they used to be.
The Sun (2011)
But much of it is plain wrong and it's time to end a few myths.
The Sun (2016)
But their import was plain enough.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
I want to make things plain and clear.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Last season was far from plain sailing.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Ask him to choose between blue plaid or plain white for a casual shirt: no chance.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Call it what you like, the colour of the season is plain old grey.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
Is it possible to get plain food in restaurants?
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Odd earrings add an instant hint of quirk to a plain white shirt.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Others report that some online fitness regimes are just plain silly.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Stick with a plain colour on top and keep shoes neutral.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
As the anatomical drawing that greets visitors to this show makes plain, light linked directly to the soul.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
In fact, the plains game are pretty low in numbers.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Not that it will be plain sailing from here on.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
Or it might just be plain stupidity.
The Sun (2015)
She was medium build and plain looking.
The Sun (2010)
Sometimes they'll just plain rip us off.
The Sun (2017)
The government had been in favour of plain packaging as a way of discouraging smoking.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
They also argue that plain packaging would allow health warnings and pictures to be increased in size.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
They are posted out in plain envelopes.
The Sun (2014)
This is just criminality plain and simple.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
We had talked about marriage before and how we would want to keep it plain and simple.
The Sun (2016)
Flood plain land is to be avoided.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
The plain fact is that such cuts would be no such thing.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Yet it is not going to be plain sailing in the coming months.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
The top of a more resistant flow might make an extensive plain, and then its successor would comprise the next flat area, perhaps half as wide.
Richard Fortey THE EARTH: An Intimate History (2004)

plump

(plʌmp)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (person, chicken) bene in carne
    2. (cheeks, face) paffuto (‑a)
    3. (wallet, cushion) (bello (‑a)) gonfio (‑a)
    4. (arms, child, hands) grassoccio (‑a), grassottello (‑a)

Example Sentences Including 'plump'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
She had a full, plump figure.
Clerk, Jayana & Siegel, Ruth Modern Literatures of the Non-Western World: Where the Waters Are Born (1995)
They plumped for the option that gave them the most flexibility and control.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Don't linger over the options, just plump for one straight away.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
For now, though, they are plump and ripe for roasting.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Healthy skin is plump and full - and looks younger.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Just a little plumped out my skin.
The Sun (2015)
Simmer for about 5 minutes until the sultanas have absorbed most of the liquid and are plump and juicy.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
So he plumped for brown hair and hazel eyes.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
So hopefully the preparations are in hand - beer cooler stocked, sofa plumped up and pizza takeaway menu by the phone.
The Sun (2014)
The mussels should be plump, juicy and taste of the sea.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
The small, plump red hips complement the beautiful autumnal foliage and last well into winter.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
This is the quail, which is like a little plump partridge.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
When buying, plump for something handmade and crafted with care.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
She had no idea who this plump lady in the beautiful flowered silk dress could be.
Diana Wynne Jones CHARMED LIFE (1977)
My hair felt plumped and malleable.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
So it has plumped for choice.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
Short and plump fish are the best.
Smith, Drew Food Watch (1994)
It was full of rather plump ladies trying to get into garments that were much too small.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It's better to be a little plump rather than too thin.
The Sun (2009)
May all the worms be plump ones in that great lake in the sky.
The Sun (2011)
Not for them the comfort of top hotels and plump feather pillows.
The Sun (2010)
Test drive one before you plump for something else.
The Sun (2014)

poor

(pʊəʳ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (gen) povero (‑a)
    2. (crop, light, visibility) scarso (‑a)
    3. (effort, excuse) misero (‑a)
    4. (memory, health, quality) cattivo (‑a)
    5. (mark) mediocre
    a poor family una famiglia povera
    he's a poor loser non sa perdere
    I'm a poor traveller sopporto male i viaggi
    it has a poor chance of success ha scarse possibilità di successo
    it's a poor thing when ... è deplorevole che... (+subjunc)
    to be poor at maths essere debole in matematica
    as poor as a church mouse povero (‑a) in canna
    you poor thing! poverino!
    poor David, he's very unlucky! povero David, è proprio sfortunato!
    you poor fool! povero scemo!
the poor

plural noun

  1. i poveri

Example Sentences Including 'poor'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
But the potential return offered is sometimes so poor there is little point in using them.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Only the deserving poor were allowed to beg.
Hunt, E. K. Property and Prophets: The Evolution of Economic Institutions and Ideologies (1995)
The idea was that a poor country could not absorb so many immigrants.
Charles Glass The Tribes Triumphant (2006)
He wanted to make people feel poor.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Many people from poorer backgrounds may be deterred from going to university under the new proposals.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Pity the poor orchestra having to play second fiddle to that load of rubbish.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
The range of possibilities included too much swearing and poor quality of the recording.
The Sun (2010)
You have to feel for the poor innocent people who have had to live through it all.
The Sun (2011)
Many people in poorer areas do not venture out at night.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Perhaps you were merely taking pity on a poor dull dog arrived from the ends of the earth!
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
And he will say that new schools must be targeted at the poorest areas.
The Sun (2011)
But education chiefs insist it will help 10,000 schools in the poorest areas.
The Sun (2017)
It has the feet to hasten to the poor and needy.
The Sun (2012)
It will lead to huge financial overspend and poor training.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Many more are too poor to afford tests.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Pets like this poor little thing.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
She added:'We are poor and cannot afford expensive treatment.
The Sun (2017)
The deserving poor do not like the undeserving poor.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
The link between financial difficulty and poor mental health is well established, according to the debt charity StepChange.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
The performances in the World Cup were poor.
The Sun (2007)
The poorest people should be with credit unions.
The Sun (2013)
The visible effects can also include obesity and poor skin quality.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
They seem to think this is something that only happens in poor areas.
The Sun (2014)
This meant that poor people subsidised banking for rich people who were less likely to incur charges.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
You can see why today's parents feel so poor.
The Sun (2016)
For some Hollywood celebrities, a good cause in a poor country is practically part of the job description.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
How can it be right that people too poor to afford legal representation are denied it?
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
If the triple lock were dropped, it would be the poor taking the financial burden.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Thanks to low wages and high rents, young people are relatively poor in real terms.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
He shall deliver the poor and needy.
Christianity Today (2000)

posh

(pɒʃ) (informal)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (people, neighbourhood, family) per bene
    2. (car, hotel, clothes) elegante

adverb

  1. to talk posh (pejorative) parlare in modo snob

prompt

(prɒmpt)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (action) tempestivo (‑a)
    2. (delivery) immediato (‑a)
    3. (payment) pronto (‑a), immediato (‑a)
    a prompt reply una risposta sollecita
    to be prompt to do sth essere sollecito (‑a) nel fare qc
    he's always very prompt (punctual) è sempre molto puntuale, è sempre puntualissimo

adverb

  1. at 6 o'clock prompt alle 6 in punto

noun

  1. (theatre) imbeccata
  2. (computing) prompt m inv

transitive verb

  1. to prompt sb to do sth spingere qn a fare qc
    it prompts the thought that ... questo fa pensare che...
  2. (theatre) suggerire a

Example Sentences Including 'prompt'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
His cry for help is prompted by a linguistic puzzle.
The Times Literary Supplement (2013)
It has prompted claims the government tried to bury bad news.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The appointment prompted speculation that the board may be looking for a buyout.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
The claims prompted more questions than answers.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
The move prompted a rise in the dollar against currencies including the euro and yen.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
The rise has prompted fears that economic weakness could be spawning criminal gangs.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
We need to encourage and foster a prompt payment culture as it supports growth and jobs.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Go straight to A&E, where you will get prompt tests and treatment.
The Sun (2016)
Many are prompted to make their own training arrangements by the lack of opportunities from their employer.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
So what's prompting the quick getaway?
The Sun (2010)
The necessary steps to make that action prompt and effective have been taken.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
The tax system exists because some rich people need prompting to help the poor.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
These are meant to act as prompts for the imagination.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Always prompting from left-back.
The Sun (2010)
This prompted the question that he explored through a compelling narrative.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
We also noted his prompt withdrawal of the image.
The Sun (2014)
This also prompts dramatic changes in the world around you.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Two stories this week will have prompted the same question.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
This must be followed by the pursuit of definitive diagnosis and prompt treatment of any diseases detected.
McKenzie, James F. & Pinger, Robert R. An Introduction to Community Health (1995)
But with prompt treatment most people make a full recovery.
The Sun (2010)
She said the victim would have died if it were not for the prompt action of paramedics.
The Sun (2009)
The case has prompted accusations that Western organisations are intent on pushing their attitudes on the continent.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
The case led to public outrage and prompted the government to launch an inquiry that instructed sumo elders to review training methods.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The proposals will prompt accusations that voters are being asked to bail out political parties, who have tried to hide their millionaire donors from public scrutiny.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
The research was partly prompted by the need to help the war wounded.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
The scandal has so far prompted three government reviews.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
They tend to prompt actions rather than direct them.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
What prompted the government to cave in before was the total paralysis of the country.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
You can see all around you that nobody needs prompting.
The Sun (2014)
There were some figures in the West who needed little prompting from the Russians to conclude that all was not as it seemed.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)

proud

(praʊd)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (person) orgoglioso (‑a), fiero (‑a)
    2. (pejorative, arrogant) superbo (‑a)
    to be proud to do sth essere fiero di fare qc
    her parents are proud of her i suoi sono orgogliosi di lei
    he was as proud as a peacock si è gonfiato come un tacchino
    that's nothing to be proud of! non mi pare che sia il caso di vantarsene!
  1. (splendid, ship) superbo (‑a), splendido (‑a)

adverb

  1. to do sb proud non far mancare nulla a qn
    to do o.s. proud non farsi mancare nulla

Example Sentences Including 'proud'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
All these are symptoms of great intelligence and that makes me so excited and so proud to have the job.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
He was always proud of the family involvement in the march.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Here is something to be proud of.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Is she proud that father and son are working together?
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
That was the second proudest moment of her career.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
This kind of courtesy actually makes one rather proud to be a tourist.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
You will find a subtle way to help a friend who is too proud to ask.
The Sun (2012)
You're very proud of your family.
The Sun (2017)
I feel proud to come from a footballing family.
The Sun (2016)
I feel very proud of them.
The Sun (2016)
It is pleased and proud to do things.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
No one will be prouder than him to represent his country.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
One of his proudest moments was enabling his mum to give up her cleaning work.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
People are proud to play for their country.
The Sun (2012)
We want to make the people proud of the way we approach the game and play.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
You feel very humbled and proud to be asked to come back.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
And it makes me feel proud to have found it.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
His father will be proud of him yet.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
It was one of his proudest moments, he recalls.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
My father is very proud of me.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
All my family are incredibly proud of me.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
He'll be sadly missed by a loving and very proud family.
The Sun (2010)
I hope he would be pleased and proud of what we are doing.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
It makes me feel very proud that we keep it all down.
The Sun (2012)
People are proud to work for us.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
The fellas who have hatched the plan are very proud and excited.
The Sun (2008)
They are strong people, proud to serve their country - and proud human beings.
The Sun (2017)
We found things no one can be proud of in our business.
The Sun (2011)
We picked ourselves up and gave ourselves something to be proud of.
The Sun (2008)
It would be massive for me and make my family proud.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Stepping up to receive my small glass trophy was a proud moment indeed.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
These results should be something to be proud of.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Were we too proud or too arrogant to accept such a compromise?
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
Is your heart proud and arrogant?
Christianity Today (2000)
Her great conquests and the gifts they brought made her proud and haughty.
Kishlansky, Mark A. (editor) Sources of the West: Readings in Western Civilization, Volume 1: From the Beginning to 1715 (1995)

quaint

(kweɪnt)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (odd) strano (‑a), bizzarro (‑a)
    2. (picturesque) pittoresco (‑a)
    3. (old-fashioned) antiquato (‑a) e pittoresco (‑a)

Example Sentences Including 'quaint'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
My pleas that people read a lot of old stuff must have seemed charmingly quaint.
The Times Literary Supplement (2010)
She remembered a quaint little intruder who had made his way into the attic once before.
Frances Hodgson Burnett A Little Princess (1905)
He looked as if he'd stumbled on some quaint custom and turned to Jean.
Paige, Frances The Glasgow Girls (1994)
Close to a quaint fishing village.
The Sun (2017)
For better or worse, we live in a society where surveillance is widespread and privacy a quaint concept that disappeared in the 20th century.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
For too long it has been known only as that quaint northern town with its one designer shop.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
It is a quaint fashion show custom that front-row celebrities wear something that gives an indication of their host's artistic intentions.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Much of the quaint village is a conservation area.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Not for the quaint village atmosphere.
The Sun (2009)
The idea is so quaint and noble it's almost cool.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
There is lots of green space, dotted with quaint village pubs that have open fires.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We live in a society where surveillance is widespread and privacy a quaint concept that disappeared in the 20th century.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
We think of petit fours as rather sickly, quaint little cakes.
The Sun (2009)
You know much about the history of the Mafia in this quaint town of yours?
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
It might sound quaint, but giving is so much more satisfying than receiving.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
She sold the place to me with talk of crashing waves and quaint villages.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Why did the organisers choose the quaint seaside town?
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Everything's so quaint and small.
The Sun (2010)
That sounds quaint today but our grandkids will laugh at the idea of fumbling around for a remote control.
The Sun (2013)
Today, the prospect of an opinion columnist doing medical research before dashing off a column sounds positively quaint.
Christianity Today (2000)
It was only the surroundings that seemed quaint.
Shawn Levy READY, STEADY, GO!: Swinging London and the Invention of Cool (2002)

queer

(kwɪəʳ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (odd) strano (‑a), curioso (‑a), singolare
    he's a queer customer è un tipo strano
    there's something queer going on here qui c'è qualcosa che non va, qui sta succedendo qc di strano
    queer in the head (informal) tocco (‑a), picchiato (‑a)
  2. (ill) strano (‑a), non giusto (‑a)
    to feel queer sentirsi poco bene
  3. (informal, offensive, homosexual) omosessuale
    he's queer è gay
  4. (suspicious) dubbio (‑a), sospetto (‑a)

noun

  1. (old-fashioned, informal, offensive, male homosexual) finocchio

transitive verb

  1. to queer sb's pitch (informal) rovinare tutto a qn, rompere le uova nel paniere a qn

quick

(kwɪk)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (fast)
      1. (in motion) veloce, rapido (‑a)
      2. (in time) svelto (‑a), veloce
    2. (agile)
      1. (reflexes) pronto (‑a)
      2. (in mind) svelto (‑a)
    a quick temper un temperamento irascibile
    a quick lunch un pranzo veloce
    it's quicker by train è più veloce in treno
    the quickest method il metodo più rapido
    a quick reply una risposta pronta
    be quick about it! fa' presto!, sbrigati!
    she's a quick learner impara presto
    she was quick to see that ... ha visto subito che...
    to be quick to act agire prontamente
    to be quick to take offence essere permaloso (‑a), offendersi subito
    do you fancy a quick one? (informal, drink) andiamo a bere qualcosa?

adverb

  1. in fretta, rapidamente
    come quick! vieni subito!
    as quick as a flash or as lightning veloce come un fulmine

noun

  1. to cut sb to the quick pungere qn sul vivo

Example Sentences Including 'quick'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
Quirk said pinning web sites makes them quicker to access.
Computing (2010)
Next time it will be a little bit easier and a little bit quicker.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
Next up is my quick and easy porridge bites.
The Sun (2017)
That cleared the hall quicker than a fire alarm.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
The touch controls are quick and responsive.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
These little meatballs are quick and easy to make and utterly delicious.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
This means that he is short of a quick entry back to his hand.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
We could have gone to a building company next door and said build us something quick.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Work opportunities you thought had slipped through your fingers are back but you need to be quick.
The Sun (2013)
You can find quick and easy ways to reach your destinations.
The Sun (2015)
But when we win it back, he wants us to get up the pitch as quick as possible.
The Sun (2017)
He's quick around the court and he changes direction extremely well.
The Sun (2016)
I need to get it out of my head pretty quick, get away for a bit.
The Sun (2016)
The ground was a little on the quick side for him there and these softer conditions should be much more to his liking.
The Sun (2016)
The mess they inherited looked beyond quick repair.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
The shorter guys are always going to get out quicker.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
They definitely don't brew as quick and feels less in them?
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
They have shown themselves to be quick learners.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
We are very quick to knock people down in this country - the old tall poppy syndrome.
The Sun (2017)
We wanted him to resolve the situation as quick as possible.
The Sun (2009)
And internet users have been quick to point out the difference between his own gilded existence and that of those in the struggling steel town.
The Sun (2016)
He got his shorts on pretty quick.
The Sun (2016)
It was one of the quickest jets around.
The Sun (2013)
She has always been quick tempered but this other side to her was a real shock.
The Sun (2015)
They would be quick to claim a moral victory.
The Sun (2007)
This will make you eat less and feel full quicker.
The Sun (2015)
What use is a quick course for people at a crash scene?
The Sun (2012)

quiet

(ˈkwaɪət)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (person)
    1. (silent) silenzioso (‑a), tranquillo (‑a)
    2. (reserved) quieto (‑a), taciturno (‑a)
    3. (calm) tranquillo (‑a), calmo (‑a)
    quiet! silenzio!
    be quiet! or keep quiet! silenzio!, sta' zitto! (when moving about) non far rumore!, fa' piano!
    you're very quiet today sei molto silenzioso oggi
    to keep sb quiet tener tranquillo (‑a) qn
    they paid him £1,000 to keep him quiet gli hanno dato 1.000 sterline perché stesse zitto
  2. (not noisy)
    1. (engine) silenzioso (‑a)
    2. (music, voice, laugh) sommesso (‑a)
    3. (sound) basso (‑a), leggero (‑a)
    the engine's very quiet il motore è molto silenzioso
  3. (not busy)
    1. (day) calmo (‑a), tranquillo (‑a)
    2. (place) tranquillo (‑a)
    a quiet little town una cittadina tranquilla
    a quiet weekend un tranquillo fine settimana
    the shops/trains are always quiet on a Monday i negozi/treni non sono mai affollati di lunedì
    business is quiet at this time of year questa è la stagione morta
    1. (discreet)
      1. (manner) dolce, garbato (‑a)
      2. (colours) tenue, smorzato (‑a)
      3. (humour) garbato (‑a)
    2. (private, intimate) intimo (‑a)
    I'll have a quiet word with him gli dirò due parole in privato
    to lead a quiet life fare una vita tranquilla
    he managed to keep the whole thing quiet è riuscito a tener segreta tutta la faccenda
    we had a quiet wedding abbiamo avuto un matrimonio semplice

noun

    1. (silence) silenzio
    2. (calm) pace f, calma, tranquillità
    on the quiet (informal)
    1. (act) di nascosto
    2. (tell) in confidenza

transitive verb

  1. (US) = quieten

Example Sentences Including 'quiet'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
The mockery of wit gives place to quiet trust and tenderness.
The Times Literary Supplement (2011)
Looking for peace and quiet in the bedroom?
The Sun (2016)
The chance to live a quieter life in the hopes it might spontaneously remit was the final factor.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
They may be able to find you some quiet study time.
The Sun (2013)
Why not go somewhere peaceful and quiet and talk to him?
The Sun (2013)
You can leave the crowds behind on the smaller, quieter islands.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
You have the quiet confidence that makes a partner keener.
The Sun (2011)
It was a busy day for a quiet man.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
This quiet man may well be here to stay.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We needed to keep him quiet and in general play we did that.
The Sun (2013)
Put it in GT mode and it becomes quiet and smooth and very comfortable.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
This counted as a relatively quiet night.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
Car engines have become much quieter but the disturbance caused by cars has grown because of the increase in traffic.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
He is such a calm and quiet person,' he said.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
In the morning we dock and the ship goes quiet.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It is anything for a quiet life.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
It was on a very quiet street and we thought there was no chance anyone would see us.
The Sun (2016)
Stores should also target special offers at them and offer incentives to visit at quieter times.
The Sun (2016)
The first thing you notice is how quiet it all is.
The Sun (2013)
They come to our country to lead a quiet life.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Was it a coded message to keep quiet?
The Sun (2016)
We found a quiet corner and sat down to catch up.
The Sun (2007)
We go to a quiet place nearby.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
What my grandfather needed more than anything was peace and quiet.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Your mind should begin to feel quieter.
The Sun (2009)
Your quiet confidence impresses bosses and an opportunity you thought you had missed is back.
The Sun (2009)
This little device emits a clicking noise which becomes quieter the more she relaxes.
Hambly, Dr Kenneth Banish Anxiety - how to stop worrying and take charge of your life (1991)
It was unusually calm and quiet.
Hyland, Paul Indian Balm - Travels in the Southern Subcontinent (1994)
The machine went quiet and soon the smoke had gone.
Claudia Hammond EMOTIONAL ROLLERCOASTER: A Journey Through the Science of Feelings (2005)

rich

(rɪtʃ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (gen) ricco (‑a)
    2. (food) con molti grassi
    3. (colour) intenso (‑a)
    4. (clothes) sontuoso (‑a)
    it was lovely but rather rich era buono ma un po' troppo sostanzioso
    that's rich! (informal, ironic) questa sì che è bella!
    the rich i ricchi
    to be rich in sth essere ricco (‑a) di qc
    to become or get or grow rich(er) arricchirsi, diventar ricco (‑a)

Example Sentences Including 'rich'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
The essays assembled here are a rich source of anecdote and oddity.
The Times Literary Supplement (2010)
Town halls have always been a rich source of stories about profligacy and waste.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Why are some countries poor and others rich?
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
But those who stay at home could be missing out on more than a rich cultural experience.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
It is a country rich in natural resources.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
It is as if to say following a richer club means the fans are more well off.
The Sun (2013)
People with assets have got richer.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Roast for 20-30 min until the glaze is rich in colour and slightly set.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The area is rich in natural treats as well.
The Sun (2015)
The colours are richer and the shading more detailed.
The Sun (2009)
The rich and famous can get away with heavily inked bodies.
The Sun (2016)
There is no scientific evidence that it has any great health benefits, but nutritionists say it is rich in minerals such as calcium and magnesium.
The Sun (2016)
We are all in shock that such a rich and generous life has been extinguished far, far too soon.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Would it benefit the rich or the poor?
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
These are men with a lot of rich friends.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
Why do rich people insist on giving horses such rubbish names?
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
To find such an abundant local concentration of large organisms clearly pointed to an unusually rich food source.
Chapman, Philip Caves and Cave Life (1993)
Finish with a rich oil to target dry ends.
Times, Sunday Times (2017)
Fry until the slivers turn a rich reddish colour and become crisp.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
Once we aspired to be rich and famous.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Some dismiss her as a woman who hitched a ride to riches and fame.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
These are savoury reds to be enjoyed with rich food.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
If this is the cause then you should ensure that the diet contains foods which are rich in these nutrients.
Martlew, Gillian & Silver, Shelley (ed) The Medicine Chest - your family's guide to prescription drugs (1988)
The gap in life expectancy between rich people and poor people is large.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
The generals around him are complicit and we know they have destroyed this immensely rich country.
The Sun (2008)
The growing inequality between the rich and the poor is a real issue here and throughout the world.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
The prize now is the rights to potential oil riches around them.
Times, Sunday Times (2012)
To think that rich oil firms could be making it unnecessarily difficult for people who are already struggling with bills is shameful.
The Sun (2013)
Your new partner has a rich singing voice.
The Sun (2008)
Life is richer than we understand or are capable of understanding.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
They have filthy rich players with a distinct air of decadence about them.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
This is a rich country and it should be a good one to grow old in.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
To get access to all the cables sent by all the diplomats working for the richest country.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)

rough

(rʌf)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (uneven, ground, road, path, edge) accidentato (‑a)
    2. (not smooth, skin, cloth, surface, hands) ruvido (‑a)
    my hands are rough ho le mani ruvide
    1. (voice) rauco (‑a)
    2. (taste, wine) aspro (‑a)
    3. (coarse, unrefined, person, manners, life) rozzo (‑a)
    4. (harsh, person, game) violento (‑a)
    5. (neighbourhood) poco raccomandabile, malfamato (‑a)
    6. (sea crossing, weather) brutto (‑a)
    rugby's a rough sport il rugby è uno sport violento
    the sea is rough today c'è mare grosso oggi, il mare è mosso oggi
    I don't want any rough stuff! (informal) niente risse!
    it's a rough area è una zona poco raccomandabile
    a rough customer (informal) un duro
    to have a rough time (of it) passare un periodaccio
    to give sb a rough time (of it) rendere la vita dura a qn
    it's rough on him che sfortuna per lui
    to feel rough (British, informal) sentirsi male
    1. (calculation, figures) approssimativo (‑a), approssimato (‑a)
    2. (plan) sommario (‑a)
    rough work or rough draft or rough copy brutta copia
    rough sketch schizzo
    rough estimate approssimazione f
    at a rough guess or estimate ad occhio e croce
    I've got a rough idea ne ho un'idea approssimativa
    he's a rough diamond sotto quei modi un po' grezzi si nasconde un cuore d'oro

adverb

  1. to play rough (sport) giocare pesante (children) fare dei giochi violenti
    to sleep rough (British) dormire all'addiaccio, dormire per strada
    a lot of people sleep rough in London a Londra tanta gente dorme per strada
    to live rough vivere in strada

noun

  1. (informal, person) duro
  2. to take the rough with the smooth prendere le cose come vengono
  3. (golf) erba alta, macchia

transitive verb

  1. to rough it (informal) far vita dura

Example Sentences Including 'rough'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
He said the big four all knew they were in for a rough ride.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
This is a rough and tough agenda.
Piercy, Nigel Market-led Strategic Change (1991)
We have rough seas and a tough environment.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
But it is a bit unsettled on rough roads.
The Sun (2016)
I felt sorry for her - she went through a really rough time.
The Sun (2016)
MY boyfriend is becoming too rough and crude in bed.
The Sun (2009)
That was an overnight trip across cold and rough seas.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
The actor admits he has a secret desire for a much rougher part.
The Sun (2009)
The men may like to play rough games with it while the women do not.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We've learned to take the rough with the smooth - this is the life we chose.
The Sun (2016)
Which should give you a rough idea of the price.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
Something rough and hairy pressed against his lips.
Tepper, Sheri S. A Plague of Angels (1993)
It feels rough and so it should.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
It set the tempo for a game of much magic and rough violence.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
There's no massive hills and the swim won't be rough.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
They played a little rougher and a little better than us.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
They should take the rough with the smooth.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
When you are playing from the rough make sure that you do know where you are going.
O'Connor, Christy & Smith, Peter Christy O'Connor Junior's Golf Masterclass (1993)
It might sound a bit rough, but I loved it.
Times, Sunday Times (2015)
Sometimes she was housed by friends and sometimes she slept rough in fields and public parks.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
The first two weeks were a bit rough.
Stewart, Dr Alan & Stewart, Maryon The Vitality Diet (1990)
That concludes the rough sketch of the terrain; now begins the journey.
Dylan Evans PLACEBO: The Belief Effect (2003)
It feels solid and safe and going over rough ground is tons of fun.
The Sun (2015)
Tens of thousands of people spent last night sleeping rough.
The Sun (2008)
There was almost always a woman with an angelic voice on his songs, to balance out his own rough masculine sound.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
This adds to friction and makes hair feel rougher.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
This research would not have been contested in the past, when tattoos were confined to rough, tough men.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
We were there three weeks and had a rough time of it.
The Sun (2010)
We will effectively end rough sleeping within our first term in government.
Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Recently released prisoners often end up sleeping rough.
Alexander Masters STUART: A Life Backwards (2005)

sallow

(ˈsæləʊ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. (complexion) giallastro (‑a)

Example Sentences Including 'sallow'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
Pancake makeup skillfully disguised the hollows beneath his eyes; his sallow cheeks were rouged.
Joyce Carol Oates FAITHLESS: TALES OF TRANSGRESSION (2003)
The skin is smooth and sallow, the eyebrows heavy and arched, the nose straight, the line of mouth tight.
Sara MacDonald SEA MUSIC (2003)
I left money on the table and got out into the sallow light on the pavement.
Robert Wilson A DARKENING STAIN (2003)

scant

(skænt)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
  1. scarso (‑a)
    with scant courtesy poco cortesemente
    to pay scant attention to prestare poca attenzione a
    they have scant respect for him hanno scarsa considerazione per lui

Example Sentences Including 'scant'

These examples have been automatically selected and may contain sensitive content. Read more…
While she is haunted by her dead daughter, she pays scant attention to her live one.
The Times Literary Supplement (2012)
But with the dollar on the floor and clients in scant supply, it was hard to focus on much else.
Times, Sunday Times (2007)
The scant supply of mortgages will make many people minded to stay put.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
There is scant economic justification for these measures.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
Yet interest has been scant.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
A losing bonus point was scant reward for their panache in the opening period.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
And there is scant chance of that.
Times, Sunday Times (2009)
It was a bold idea at a time when the genre was afforded scant respect by the literary establishment.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
It was hard to blame fans for keeping away when the clubs showed scant regard for the competition.
Times, Sunday Times (2013)
Oscar gained scant consolation in the dying seconds.
The Sun (2014)
The young pretenders have scant regard for reputations.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
That will be scant consolation to the trapped men.
Times, Sunday Times (2010)
The 1 per cent dividend yield gives scant reward.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
The evidence was either scant or false.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
There is also scant evidence that it will get mothers back to work.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
We are also concerned that scant attention is being paid to the cost of running the services promised.
Times, Sunday Times (2008)
When we see how they are not being transparent with their members it shows very scant regard for the founding philosophy.
Times, Sunday Times (2006)
So far he has shown scant interest in tackling them.
Times, Sunday Times (2014)
There is scant chance of putting it back.
Times, Sunday Times (2011)
It pays scant respect to human dignity because it denies human freedom.
Christianity Today (2000)

shallow

(ˈʃæləʊ)

adjective

Word forms:comparative -er, superlative -est
    1. (water etc) basso (‑a), poco profondo (‑a)
    2. (dish) piano (‑a)
    3. (breathing) leggero (‑a)
    4. (figurative)