English

Definition of 'recurrent'

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Synonyms of "recurrent"
Synonyms of "recurrent"
French Translation of "recurrent"
French Translation of "recurrent"
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Example sentences containing 'recurrent'

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The need to improve human capital was a recurrent theme. Times, Sunday Times (2011)The fraught issue of linguistic incompetence was a recurrent theme in the history of the ambassadors. Jonathan Wright Ambassadors: From Ancient Greece to the Nation State (2006)In so doing there have been a number of recurrent themes. Walklate, Sandra Victimology - the victim and the criminal justice process (1989)Poor productivity and low skills are a recurrent problem for the economy. Times, Sunday Times (2009)The software is based on some simple devices and a lot of ad hoc patches to cope with particular recurrent problems. Salkie, Raphael The Chomsky Update - Linguistics and Politics (1990)Father's cooking of odd animal organs is a recurrent theme. The Times Literary Supplement (2010)The economy remained prosperous, but the government faced recurrent problems collecting sufficient taxes. Stearns, Peter N. World History: Patterns of Change and Continuity (1995)It is a recurrent problem, the cause of which has been solely wear and tear. Times, Sunday Times (2006)In practice, there are two recurrent problems with these programs. McKenzie, James F. & Pinger, Robert R. An Introduction to Community Health (1995)Famine has been a recurrent problem in some African nations in recent years. Sanderson, Stephen K. Macrosociology: An Introduction to Human Societies (1995)The remainder missed out on at least one intervention that could have improved their chances of survival and reduced the likelihood of recurrent problems. Times, Sunday Times (2016)A recurrent theme is what the characters should do to prepare for this. Times, Sunday Times (2006)A recurrent theme is that science solves one problem only to set itself another. Times, Sunday Times (2016)Most people get only one attack of shingles, but for an unlucky minority it can be a recurrent problem. Times, Sunday Times (2011)An enduring feature of this crusade is the tendency to blame the unrest of the 1960s for any recurrent social problems. Eccleshall, Robert English Conservatism since the Restoration: An introduction and anthology (1990)The recurrent theme is: 'What does he know about us? Times, Sunday Times (2014)Teeth Dreams are indicators of anxiety, which seems to be a recurrent theme of the album. The Sun (2014)No wonder, too, that her dreams have a recurrent theme. Times, Sunday Times (2011)A recurrent theme at Davos this year was the growing pressure that businesses are under to keep an edge over the competition. Times, Sunday Times (2012)The stifling heat in the studio - a recurrent problem at this venue - provided an extra layer of discomfort. Times, Sunday Times (2011)Across all records on what it is like to go into orbit, there is the recurrent theme of humility, and perspective. Times, Sunday Times (2008)Suddenly rejected by publishers as well, he began to suffer from recurrent mental illness, spending the rest of his life confined to hospitals. The Times Literary Supplement (2014)

Trends of 'recurrent'

In Common Usage. recurrent is one of the 10000 most commonly used words in the Collins dictionary

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Translations for 'recurrent'

British English: recurrent ADJECTIVE
A recurrent event or feeling happens or is experienced more than once.
Family is a recurrent theme in the work.
  • American English: recurrent
  • Brazilian Portuguese: recorrente
  • Chinese: 反复出现的/一再发生的情感 /事情
  • European Spanish: repetido
  • French: fréquent
  • German: sich wiederholend
  • Italian: ricorrente
  • Japanese: 繰り返し起こる
  • Korean: 반복되는
  • European Portuguese: recorrente
  • Latin American Spanish: repetido

Source

Definition of recurrent from the Collins English Dictionary
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